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I have this data:

ID   NAME   DATE
3    JOHN   2011-08-08
2    YOKO   2010-07-07
1    JOHN   2009-06-06

Code (for SQL Server 2005):

DECLARE @TESTABLE TABLE (id int, name char(4), date smalldatetime) 
INSERT INTO @TESTABLE VALUES (3, 'JOHN', '2011-08-08')
INSERT INTO @TESTABLE VALUES (2, 'YOKO', '2010-07-07')
INSERT INTO @TESTABLE VALUES (1, 'JOHN', '2009-06-06')

I want to get, for each NAME, the ID that has the most recent DATE. Like this:

3    JOHN   2011-08-08
2    YOKO   2010-07-07

What is the most elegant way of accomplishing this?

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted
;WITH x AS 
(
    SELECT ID, NAME, [DATE], 
      rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
      (PARTITION BY NAME ORDER BY [DATE] DESC)
    FROM @TESTABLE
)
SELECT ID, NAME, [DATE] FROM x WHERE rn = 1
  ORDER BY [DATE] DESC;

Try to avoid reserved words (and vague column names) like [DATE]...

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2  
+1 for reserved words caution –  JNK Sep 19 '11 at 15:33
    
This is elegant. Is it more efficient (faster) than the JOIN 2 versions ? –  iDevlop Sep 19 '11 at 15:35
2  
@IDevlop - i think speed will depend more on your indexing than on the query. I think the variation between this and the other version(s) should be minimal performance wise. –  JNK Sep 19 '11 at 15:40
    
You can compare the execution plans, I doubt you'll find much difference. You will want to compare the results in the case of ties, though (and/or define what you want to do in the event of ties). –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '11 at 15:45
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SELECT <fields>
FROM SourceTable st
INNER JOIN (SELECT name, MAX(Datefield) as Datefield
            FROM SourceTable
            GROUP BY name) x
    ON x.Name = st.name
    AND x.datefield = st.datefield
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If your source tables are normalized (ex. one table for CUSTOMERS and another table for ORDERS) you can use CROSS APPLY like this:

DECLARE @CUSTOMER TABLE(id int primary key, name char(4));
INSERT INTO @CUSTOMER VALUES (3, 'JOHN');
INSERT INTO @CUSTOMER VALUES (2, 'YOKO');
INSERT INTO @CUSTOMER VALUES (1, 'JOHN');


DECLARE @ORDER TABLE (orderid int identity(1,1) primary key, customerid int, [date] smalldatetime, UNIQUE(customerid,[date] DESC,orderid)) ;
INSERT INTO @ORDER VALUES (3, '2011-08-08');
INSERT INTO @ORDER VALUES (2, '2010-07-07');
INSERT INTO @ORDER VALUES (1, '2009-06-06');

SELECT  *
FROM    @CUSTOMER c
CROSS APPLY
(
    SELECT  TOP 1 o.*
    FROM    @ORDER o
    WHERE   o.customerid = c.id
    ORDER BY o.[date], o.orderid DESC
) ca

With proper indexes (UNIQUE(customerid,[date] DESC,orderid)) you can get a good performance. In this examples I have used a UNIQUE constraint to define a non-clustered index on a table variable to speed up CROSS APPLY sub-query.

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