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Looking through the examples and explanation of running time of nested for loops on http://faculty.simpson.edu/lydia.sinapova/www/cmsc250/LN250_Weiss/L03-BigOh.htm#Counting, and the second example does not look right to me.

example 1

sum = 0;  
for( i = 0; i < n; i++)  
    for( j = 0; j < n; j++)  
        sum++;

Makes sense right away. Outside for loop is O(n). Inner for Loop is O(n) as well. Multiply them together, O(n) * O(n) = O(n*n) = O(n^2).

Second example. Inner for loop does not start with 0.

sum = 0;  
for( i = 0; i < n; i++)  
    for( j = i; j < n; j++)  
        sum++;

Running time of the inner loop will be ( 1 + 2 + … + n) = n*(n+1)/2 = O(n^2) As in first example, outer loop runs at O(n). Therefore, total running time is O(n) * O(n^2) = O(n^3). I am right, or I am missing something ? Thanks !

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're adding up the total running time of the inner loop - not the running time per iteration of the outer loop. The running time of the inner loop per outer iteration is still O(n), leading to an overall result of O(n2).

To put it another way - if you understand the first example, and the second example does less work than the first example, how could it have greater complexity?

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I think I figured out where I was wrong. Indeed (1 + 2 + … + n) = n*(n+1)/2 = O(n^2) First of all, inner loop depends on outer loop, and you can't simply multiply complexities as we did in previous examples. We have to count number number of executions of inner loop per all n executions of outer loop. Therefore, we get series made of n terms. Thanks for help ! –  newprint Sep 19 '11 at 17:20

(1 + 2 + … + n) = n*(n+1)/2 = O(n^2) is the total time for the program. You don't need to then multiply it by O(n) for the outer loop; you've already taken the outer loop into account.

[Note: technically, it's ok to say that the algorithm is O(n^3). It's just a bit misleading.]

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The running time of the inner loop is about n/2 on average, so that's still O(n), the same as in the first example.

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Response to first two answers above. I don't see how the (1 + 2 + … + n) = n*(n+1)/2 = O(n^2) will be the total running time

Say, n = 3

sum = 0;  
for( i = 0; i < n; i++)  
    for( j = i; j < n; j++)  
        sum++;

Total running time for inner loop is 1times + 2times + 3times

So, where outer loop comes into play ? It runs O(n) times as well (as it did in first example)

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Read the post with the accepted answer to see where I made logical error. –  newprint Sep 19 '11 at 17:22

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