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UPDATE:
I have solved my problem. I was looking for

coord_cartesian(xlim = c(800, 2100), ylim = c(0, 0.0021))

Thanks to every one who tried to help!

QUESTION WAS:
I would like to draw a nice picture of what is the difference between normal and logistic distributions. I have reached that point :

 x=seq(1000,2000,length=200)  
 dat <- data.frame(
   norm = dnorm(x,mean=1500,sd=200), 
   logistic = dlogis(x,location=1500,scale=200), x = x
 )
 ggplot(data=dat, aes(x=x)) + 
   geom_polygon(aes(y=norm), fill="red", alpha=0.6) + 
   geom_polygon(aes(y=logistic), fill="blue", alpha=0.6) + 
   xlab("") + ylab("") +   
   opts(title="Logistic and Normal Distributions") + 
   scale_x_continuous(expand = c(0, 0)) + 
   scale_y_continuous(expand = c(0, 0))

However the logistic one is "cut" at the bottom. I think what I should do is to draw this distribution from 0 to 3000 for example but show only 1000-2000.

Any clues how to do this?

I tried scale_x_continuous(limits = c(1000, 2000)) but this does not work

UPDATE:

I have updated my code so I have legend, now it looks like this:

  x=seq(700,2300,length=200)  
  dat2 <- data.frame(x=x)
  dat2$value <- dnorm(x,mean=1500,sd=200)
  dat2$type <- "Normal"

 dat1 <- data.frame(x=x)
 dat1$value <- dlogis(x,location=1500,scale=200)       
 dat1$type <- "Logistic"

 dat <- rbind(dat1, dat2)

 ggplot(data=dat, aes(x=x, y=value, colour=type, fill=type)) + geom_polygon(alpha=0.6) + scale_y_continuous(expand = c(0, 0))
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4 Answers

I would draw it using z-scores, from [-2 ; +2]. This has the side benefit that your problem goes away.

x=seq(-2,2,length=200)  
dat <- data.frame(
  norm = dnorm(x,mean=0,sd=0.2), 
  logistic = dlogis(x,location=0,scale=0.2), x = x
)
p <- ggplot(data=dat, aes(x=x)) + 
  geom_polygon(aes(y=norm), fill="red", alpha=0.6) + 
  geom_polygon(aes(y=logistic), fill="blue", alpha=0.6) + 
  xlab("z") + ylab("") + 
  scale_x_continuous(expand = c(0, 0)) + 
  scale_y_continuous(expand = c(0, 0)) +  
  opts(title="Logistic and Normal Distributions") 

print(p)

enter image description here

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The solution is to use

+ coord_cartesian(xlim = c(800, 2100), ylim = c(0, 0.0021))
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The reason it cuts off the bottom is because geom_polygon literally draws the polygon consisting of lines connecting the points you give it. So the flat line across the bottom of the distribution is just connecting the first and last value in your data frame. If you want it to extend to the bottom you can add the appropriate points to your data frame:

ggplot(data=dat, aes(x=x)) + 
    geom_polygon(aes(y=norm), fill="red", alpha=0.6) + 
    geom_polygon(data = rbind(c(NA,0,1000),dat,c(NA,0,2000)),aes(y=logistic), fill="blue", alpha=0.6) + xlab("") + ylab("") +   
    opts(title="Logistic and Normal Distributions")+ 
    scale_x_continuous(expand = c(0, 0)) + 
    scale_y_continuous(expand = c(0, 0))

enter image description here

Edited for clarity

You can tinker with this to get it to go down only as far as you want by adding points with the right values. For instance, I forced the logistic distribution to fill all the way down to zero. You could make it level with the normal distribution by rbinding the minimum normal density value instead. Also, be careful where you add them in your data frame. geom_polygon will connect the dots in the order they appear. That's why I added one at the beginning of the data frame and one at the end.

Edit 2

Based on your revised code, my solution still works fine:

x=seq(700,2300,length=200)  
dat2 <- data.frame(x=x)
dat2$value <- dnorm(x,mean=1500,sd=200)
dat2$type <- "Normal"

dat1 <- data.frame(x=x)
dat1$value <- dlogis(x,location=1500,scale=200)       
dat1$type <- "Logistic"

#Append extra points at the top/bottom to 
# complete the polygon
dat1 <- rbind(data.frame(x=700,value=0,type = "Logistic"),dat1,
                data.frame(x=2300,value=0,type = "Logistic"))

dat <- rbind(dat1, dat2)

ggplot(data=dat, aes(x=x, y=value, colour=type, fill=type)) + 
       geom_polygon(alpha=0.6) + 
       scale_y_continuous(expand = c(0, 0))

enter image description here

And personally, I would prefer this over coord_cartesian, since I'm a stickler about starting my axes from zero.

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I ran your code, and then analyzed the values of norm and logistic:

Rgames: mystat(dat$logistic)

  min      max     mean   median

3.51e-04 1.25e-03 8.46e-04 8.63e-04

 sdev      skew kurtosis

2.96e-04 -1.33e-01 -1.4

Rgames: mystat(dat$norm)

  min      max     mean   median

8.76e-05 1.99e-03 9.83e-04 9.06e-04

 sdev     skew kurtosis

6.62e-04 1.67e-01 -1.48

So your logistic values are in fact correctly plotted. As the other answers showed, there are preferable ways to create your underlying data.

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