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I am writing the unit test and receive exception when trying to raise the event from abstract class mock. Here is the sample code:

    public abstract class AbstractBase : EntityObject
    {}

    [TestMethod]
    public void MyTest()
    {

        var mock = new Mock<AbstractBase>();
        var notificationMock = entityMock.As<INotifyPropertyChanged>();

        var propertyChangedMapper = new PropertyChangedMapper();

        bool eventReceived = false;
        propertyChangedMapper.MyPropertyChanged +=
            (sender, eventArgs) =>
                {
                    eventReceived = true;
                };

        propertyChangedMapper.Subscribe((AbstractBase)notificationMock.Object);

        Assert.IsFalse(eventReceived);

        notificationMock.Raise(e=>e.PropertyChanged += null, 
                                   new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Property1"));

        Assert.IsTrue(eventReceived);
  }

Obviously I could use mock on INotifyPropertyChanged and event is risen just fine, but inside of PropertyChangedMapper I need to cast the sender to AbstractBase which fails if using Mock<INotifyPropertyChanged>

EDIT: As per suggestion using Mock.As<>() seems to be the right way to go, the only problem above is that the event risen from notificationMock has nothing to do with the original mock of the object. Code:

        notificationMock.Object.PropertyChanged += (s, e) =>
        {
            var result = "this one is fired as it should";
        };

        mock.Object.PropertyChanged += (s, e) =>
        {
            var result = "this one is not called but is actually what I need";
        }; 

        notificationMock.Raise(e => e.PropertyChanged += null, 
                 new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Property1"));
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It doesn't matter which one it calls, as long as one does get called. My guess is that you could actually set up either one or the other. But setting up both will lead to the mock internally choosing one over the other. –  Chris Ammerman Sep 19 '11 at 19:41
    
For more proof that it doesn't matter which is called, consider that the type system works similarly for virtual members and their overrides. For example, if you added to AbstractBase an override for EntityObject's INPC event, there is no way for any code consuming AbstractBase to force EntityObject's version to be called. Even if you cast to EntityObject, the AbstractBase member will be called. Once a base member is overridden, only the deriving class can access the original base member. –  Chris Ammerman Sep 19 '11 at 19:45
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may be able to do the desired cast if you make your mock a mult-mock. Since Moq mocks are tied to an individual type via the generic argument, you must explicitly progressively add additional interfaces or super-classes to the mock, and then use the end product in your test. A quick example of how to do this is below.

var baseMock = new Mock<AbstractBase>();
var inpcMock = baseMock.As<INotifyPropertyChanged>();

// ...setup event...

propertyChangedMapper.Subscribe(inpcMock.Object);

// ... assertions ...
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1  
Great feature! However it looks like event is NOT risen via inpcMock.Raise(e => e.PropertyChanged += null, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Property1")); - any idea why? –  Paul Sep 19 '11 at 17:29
    
Please see the update above –  Paul Sep 19 '11 at 18:30
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Given the way you're doing this, there is no implementation of the event. The interface itself is just the contract that says "I have a PropertyChanged event." If you want to raise that event, you have to provide a handler, even if it doesn't do anything. Implement the PropertyChanged event in your mocked class to raise the event.

UPDATE:

Try this code for your AbstractBase:

public abstract class AbstractBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
     public virtual event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
     private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String info)
     {
         if (PropertyChanged != null)
         {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
         }
     }
}
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So what exactly should be done to resolve this exception? –  Paul Sep 19 '11 at 16:45
1  
As code like "public abstract class AbstractBase : INotifyPropertyChanged {} " is unable to compile, i'd think he has just shortened the code here... –  David Sep 19 '11 at 16:48
    
@Paul: See update. –  Dave Swersky Sep 19 '11 at 16:49
    
Yes, it was shortened indeed to clarify the sample but in fact introduced more confusion. Please see the edit above –  Paul Sep 19 '11 at 16:59
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Is your PropertyChanged event declared as a virtual event?

public abstract class AbstractBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
   public virtual event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

(See also: Jon Skeet on virtual events.)

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Please see the edit above –  Paul Sep 19 '11 at 16:58
    
I guess I'm not clear on the problem. Your original code worked fine for me (without all of the As<>() stuff). –  ladenedge Sep 19 '11 at 19:46
    
Making the event virtual works too, but only if this is my class that implements the events. When inheriting from base classes which already have an implementation - no way to make the events virtual. Thanks for your answer. –  Paul Sep 19 '11 at 20:42
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