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I have a App that need authorization to access all Controllers/Actions. Except the Login and Error Controllers/Actions.

With this scenario, working in a defensive manner is better to keep default restrict access to all Controllers/Actions(without Authorize Attribute) and select with a custom Attribute only those who do not.

Have you guys done something like this?

I have a MVC Filter that execute before all Actions if the Logged User have access to them:

public class ValidatePermissionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
    {
        bool isAuthorized = false;

        //Logic that verify if logged user have permission to access the requested Controller/Action
        ...

        //Redirect to a page Error if Logged User don't have Authorization
        if (!isAuthorized)
        {
            RouteValueDictionary redirectTargetDictionary = new RouteValueDictionary();
            redirectTargetDictionary.Add("action", "Erro");
            redirectTargetDictionary.Add("controller", "Index");

            context.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(redirectTargetDictionary);
        }
    }
}

I'm thinking the best way to do this. I can create a Blank Custom Attribute and put in the Controllers do not need authorization and check it in my Filter:

public class ValidatePermissionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
    {
        bool isAuthorized = false;

        var DoNotRequiresAuthorizationAttributes = context.ActionDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DoNotRequiresAuthorizationAttribute), false);

        if (DoNotRequiresAuthorizationAttributes.Length > 0)
            isAuthorized = true;

        ...

        //Redirect to a page Error if Logged User don't have Authorization
        if (!isAuthorized)
        {
            RouteValueDictionary redirectTargetDictionary = new RouteValueDictionary();
            redirectTargetDictionary.Add("action", "Erro");
            redirectTargetDictionary.Add("controller", "Index");

            context.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(redirectTargetDictionary);
        }
    }
}

What you expert Guys think?

Update:

Thinking better, I can replace my Filter with a Custom Authorize Attribute and register that to act in all Controllers/Actions in Global.asax:

public static void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters)
{
    filters.Add(new MyCustomAuthorizeAttribute());
}

Update 2:

Instead create a Blank Custom Attribute and put in the Controllers do not need authorization I pass in Parameters of my Custom Authorize the Controllers do not need authorization (in Global.asax):

public static void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters)
{
    filters.Add(new ValidatePermissionAttribute("Login", "Erro"));
}

My Authorize Attribute:

public class ValidatePermissionAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    ...

    public ValidatePermissionAttribute(params string[] optionalControllers)
    {
        _optionalControllers = optionalControllers;
    }

    ...
}

Update 3:

Conditional Filters is the way to go.

share|improve this question
    
i like the approach... –  David Sep 19 '11 at 17:04
    
@David, global and conditional filters are the standard approach. :) –  bzlm Sep 19 '11 at 17:23
    
no, srsly?! :-X –  David Sep 19 '11 at 17:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have you considered using Conditional Filters in ASP.NET MVC 3?

share|improve this answer

Several ways to handle bulk implementations of attributes:

I've been told before the issue with using a filter attribute is that the result can be cached via output caching, and then this wouldn't run. It's better to implement an IAuthorizationFilter interface (or AuthorizeAttribute class) and create an authorization filter instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
Instead of creating a Custom Controller Base Class I can register my Attribute in Global.asax. What you think? –  Acaz Souza Sep 19 '11 at 17:15
3  
@Acaz, if you mean GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new MyActionFilterAttribute());, then that's what this answer suggests. –  bzlm Sep 19 '11 at 17:22
    
@Acaz yes that should work great for you to apply it globally. –  Brian Mains Sep 19 '11 at 17:27

If the goal is just to reduce the need to re-declare the attribute in many places, it seems one could achieve the same by creating one abstract AuthorizeController with the attribute, and any controller whose actions all require authorization can inherit that.

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