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There is a field in my web application into which the user is expected to enter one or more digits separated by one or more periods.

The following is a typical example of what the user may enter:

589327498321.43243214.32421423.

I've written the following JavaScript code to test value:

var uid = $(this).val();
var uidRegex = /(^\d|\.$)+/;
var isValid = uidRegex.test(uid);

I'm getting the wrong result. It seems that this code tells me that the entry is valid if the user's entry begins with a digit or period. How can I fix this so that the entire entry must consist exclusively of digits and periods to be valid?

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So, start with a digit, allow periods and digits after the first character, no empty strings, right? –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sounds like the pattern you're looking for is

Number followed by any number dot + number sequences

If so try the following /^(\d)+(\d|\.\d)+$/

EDIT

OP indicated in comments that consecutive dots are legal. Here's the updated regex to account for that as well /^(\d)+(\d|\.)+$/

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+1: This works for me. I believe that the problem is that I had my beginning and end of string markers nested inside the parenthesis. Thank you. –  Daniel Allen Langdon Sep 19 '11 at 17:19
    
@Rice This really worked? In that case, is the final period from the example "1423." actually just sentance ending punctuation and not part of your user's input? –  Buh Buh Sep 19 '11 at 17:29
    
@Buh, that's how I was interpreting the question. –  JaredPar Sep 19 '11 at 17:32
    
@Rice Flour Cookies: You mentioned "separated by one or more periods". Do you mean to allow 123...45? –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:36
    
I realize that my example is very simplistic and does include edge cases such as 1323...45, but I'm not particularly concerned about it. –  Daniel Allen Langdon Sep 19 '11 at 18:19
/^(\d|\.)+$/

That should do it =]

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1  
This will match "abc123". You'll need to enforce the beginning and end of the string. –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:14
    
Whoops! Fixed =] –  Korvin Szanto Sep 19 '11 at 17:17

You may also consider:

var uidRegex = /^\d+(\d|\.)+$/;
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This allows for the input string to begin with a . which appears to be illegal according to the question –  JaredPar Sep 19 '11 at 17:14
    
@JaredPar: Good call. I'll correct. –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:15

How about this pattern: /^\d+(\.+\d+)*$/

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/^\d[\d\.]*$/
  ^   ^--any number of digits or periods
  |-start with a digit
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var uidRegex = /[^\d.]/;
var isValid = ! uidRegex.test(uid);

http://jsfiddle.net/uKm7F/


If you want to disallow a period at the beginning of the string, use this:

var uidRegex = /(?:[^\d.]|^\.)/;
var isValid = ! uidRegex.test(uid);

http://jsfiddle.net/uKm7F/6/

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This will match "abc123". You'll need to enforce the beginning and end of the string. –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:15
    
@Jonathan M - You couldn't be more wrong: jsfiddle.net/uKm7F/1 –  Joseph Silber Sep 19 '11 at 17:16
    
Don't underestimate my ability to be wrong... –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:18
    
I like the reverse thinking on this. However, it allows a beginning . and empty strings. –  Jonathan M Sep 19 '11 at 17:27
    
@Jonathan M - ...which can easily be solved by: /(?:[^\d.]|^\.)/: jsfiddle.net/uKm7F/6 . I updated my answer... –  Joseph Silber Sep 19 '11 at 17:37

If your field is required (and must contain at least 2 characters), this will do it:

/^(\d)+(\d|\.)*(\d)+$/
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