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I have a function (legacy) that reads the first few lines of a file to determine its type, then closes and reopens the file so it can re-read the entire file using the correct interpreter. The gist is:

void readFile(const char *filename) {
  ifstream is(filename);
  Filetype ft = determineFileType(is);
  is.close();
  is.open(filename);
  parseFile(is, ft);
}

I needed a similar function that can work on an already-opened stream. I created a new function that takes an ostream & instead of a char *filename -- basically this:

void readFile(istream &is) {
  std::ios::streampos pos = is.tellg();
  Filetype ft = determineFileType(is);
  is.seekg(pos);
  parseFile(is, ft);
}

It seems to work when the istream is actually a stringstream or an fstream but I wonder if I'm just getting lucky. I also did a small test on seekg-ing std::cin and it worked, which surprised me.

So my question: what kinds of streams are you allowed to use seekg on? When will it fail? Spec references would be great -- I looked through and the stuff on seekg, pubseekpos, seekpos, seekoff weren't helpful at all.

I'd like to reimplement the original function in terms of the new (as below), but I just don't know if that's safe.

void readFile(const char *filename) {
  ifstream is(filename);
  readFile(is);
  is.close();
}
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I think seekg is implemented for all input streams, but it may just be a no-op if the stream isn't seekable. –  Kerrek SB Sep 19 '11 at 17:57
    
Right, it's implemented for all istreams, but it may fail and set failbit I think. Just wondering if there are any specs on when that may happen -- like, maybe on fstream it's guaranteed to work and on std::cin it's implementation dependent. –  Dan Sep 19 '11 at 18:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only real answer one can give is that it works where it works. In the case of std::stringbuf, it should work everywhere. In the case of std::filebuf, whether it works or not depends on the system; it will generally work if the filebuf is opened on an actual file, but will usually fail (perhaps silently, if the system doesn't report an error) for many other types of input: from a keyboard, or a named pipe, for example.

A more robust solution would be to cache the initial input, and re-read it from the cache.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid of that. Too bad there's no way to tell what kind of istream I have. I agree about a cache being a better solution. For the moment though, I'm trying to reduce the chances that I break existing code. Thanks for the answer! –  Dan Sep 20 '11 at 3:52

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