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I have a foreach loop and need to execute some logic when the last item is chosen from the List, e.g.:

 foreach (Item result in Model.Results)
 {
      //if current result is the last item in Model.Results
      //then do something in the code
 }

Can I know which loop is last without using for loop and counters?

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1  
Take a look at my answer here for a solution I posted to a related question. –  Brian Gideon Jul 8 '13 at 1:14
    

13 Answers 13

up vote 82 down vote accepted

If you just need to do something with the last element (as opposed to something different with the last element then using LINQ will help here:

Item last = Model.Results.Last();
// do something with last

If you need to do something different with the last element then you'd need something like:

Item last = Model.Results.Last();
foreach (Item result in Model.Results)
{
    // do something with each item
    if (result.Equals(last))
    {
        // do something different with the last item
    }
    else
    {
        // do something different with every item but the last
    }
}

Though you'd probably need to write a custom comparer to ensure that you could tell that the item was the same as the item returned by Last().

This approach should be used with caution as Last may well have to iterate through the collection. While this might not be a problem for small collections, if it gets large it could have performance implications.

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1  
What I needed was : When the loop is going trough its last item : foreach (Item result in Model.Results) { if (result == Model.Results.Last()) { <div>last</div>; } Seems that you pretty much meant same thing. –  mishap Sep 19 '11 at 19:38
4  
You code will iterate twice thru the entire collection - bad if the collection isn't small. See this answer. –  Shimmy Jul 4 '13 at 2:18
13  
This doesn't really work if you have duplicates in your collection. For example, if you're working with a collection of strings, and there are any duplicates, then that "different with the last item" code will execute for every occurrence of the last item in the list. –  muttley91 Sep 27 '13 at 18:22
1  
This answer is old, but for others looking at this answer, you can get the last element and ensure you do not have to loop through the elements by using: Item last = Model.Results[Model.Results.Count - 1] The count property of a list does not require looping. If you have duplicates in your list, then just use an iterator variable in a for loop. Regular old for loops are not bad. –  Michael Harris Jan 7 at 19:45

How about a good old fashioned for loop?

for (int i = 0; i < Model.Results.Count; i++) {

     if (i == Model.Results.Count - 1) {
           // this is the last item
     }
}

Or using Linq and the foreach:

foreach (Item result in Model.Results)   
{   
     if (Model.Results.IndexOf(result) == Model.Results.Count - 1) {
             // this is the last item
     }
}
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As Chris shows, Linq will work; just use Last() to get a reference to the last one in the enumerable, and as long as you aren't working with that reference then do your normal code, but if you ARE working with that reference then do your extra thing. Its downside is that it will always be O(N)-complexity.

You can instead use Count() (which is O(1) if the IEnumerable is also an ICollection; this is true for most of the common built-in IEnumerables), and hybrid your foreach with a counter:

var i=0;
var count = Model.Results.Count();
foreach (Item result in Model.Results)
 {
      if(++i==count) //this is the last item
 }
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Using Last() on certain types will loop thru the entire collection!
Meaning that if you make a foreach and call Last(), you looped twice! which I'm sure you'd like to avoid in big collections.

Then the solution is to use a do while loop:

using (var enumerator = .GetEnumerator())
{

  var last = !enumerator.MoveNext();
  T current;

  while(!last)
  {
    current = enumerator.Current;        

    //process item

    last = !enumerator.MoveNext();        

    //process item extension according to flag; flag means item

  }
}

Test

Unless the collection type is of type IList<T> the Last() function will iterate thru all collection elements.

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As Shimmy has pointed out, using Last() can be a performance problem, for instance if your collection is the live result of a LINQ expression. To prevent multiple iterations, you could use a "ForEach" extension method like this:

var elements = new[] { "A", "B", "C" };
elements.ForEach((element, info) => {
    if (!info.IsLast) {
        Console.WriteLine(element);
    } else {
        Console.WriteLine("Last one: " + element);
    }
});

The extension method looks like this (as an added bonus, it will also tell you the index and if you're looking at the first element):

public static class EnumerableExtensions {
    public delegate void ElementAction<in T>(T element, ElementInfo info);

    public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> elements, ElementAction<T> action) {
        IEnumerator<T> enumerator = elements.GetEnumerator();
        bool isFirst = true;
        bool hasNext = enumerator.MoveNext();
        int index = 0;
        while (hasNext) {
            T current = enumerator.Current;
            hasNext = enumerator.MoveNext();
            action(current, new ElementInfo(index, isFirst, !hasNext));
            isFirst = false;
            index++;
        }
    }

    public struct ElementInfo {
        public ElementInfo(int index, bool isFirst, bool isLast)
            : this() {
            Index = index;
            IsFirst = isFirst;
            IsLast = isLast;
        }

        public int Index { get; private set; }
        public bool IsFirst { get; private set; }
        public bool IsLast { get; private set; }
    }
}
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The iterator implementation does not provide that. Your collection might be an IList that is accessible via an index in O(1). In that case you can use a normal for-loop:

for(int i = 0; i < Model.Results.Count; i++)
{
  if(i == Model.Results.Count - 1) doMagic();
}

If you know the count, but cannot access via indices (thus, result is an ICollection), you can count yourself by incrementing an i in the foreach's body and comparing it to the length.

All this isn't perfectly elegant. Chris's solution may be the nicest I've seen so far.

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In comparing performance of your counter within the foreach idea vs Chris' solution, I wonder which would cost more- a single Last() call, or the sum of all the added increment operations. I suspect it would be close. –  TTT Jan 6 '14 at 23:00

The best approach would probably be just to execute that step after the loop: e.g.

foreach(Item result in Model.Results)
{
   //loop logic
}

//Post execution logic

Or if you need to do something to the last result

foreach(Item result in Model.Results)
{
   //loop logic
}

Item lastItem = Model.Results[Model.Results.Count - 1];

//Execute logic on lastItem here
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".Last()" didnt work for me, so I had to do something like this:

Dictionary<string, string> iterativeDictionary = someOtherDictionary;
var index = 0;
iterativeDictionary.ForEach(kvp => 
    index++ == iterativeDictionary.Count ? 
        /*it's the last item */ :
        /*it's not the last item */
);
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Jon Skeet created a SmartEnumerable<T> type a while back to solve this exact issue. You can see it's implementation here:

http://codeblog.jonskeet.uk/2007/07/27/smart-enumerations/

To download: http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/miscutil/

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The accepted answer will not work for duplicates in the collection. If you're set on the foreach, you can just add your own indexing variable(s).

int last = Model.Results.Count - 1;
int index = 0;
foreach (Item result in Model.Results)
{
    //Do Things

    if (index == last)
        //Do Things with the last result

    index++;
}
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Making some small adjustments to the excelent code of Jon Skeet, you can even make it smarter by allowing access to the previous and next item. Of course this means you'll have to read ahead 1 item in the implementation. For performance reasons, the previous and next item are only retained for the current iteration item. It goes like this:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
// Based on source: http://jonskeet.uk/csharp/miscutil/

namespace Generic.Utilities
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Static class to make creation easier. If possible though, use the extension
    /// method in SmartEnumerableExt.
    /// </summary>
    public static class SmartEnumerable
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Extension method to make life easier.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">Type of enumerable</typeparam>
        /// <param name="source">Source enumerable</param>
        /// <returns>A new SmartEnumerable of the appropriate type</returns>
        public static SmartEnumerable<T> Create<T>(IEnumerable<T> source)
        {
            return new SmartEnumerable<T>(source);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Type chaining an IEnumerable&lt;T&gt; to allow the iterating code
    /// to detect the first and last entries simply.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type to iterate over</typeparam>
    public class SmartEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<SmartEnumerable<T>.Entry>
    {

        /// <summary>
        /// Enumerable we proxy to
        /// </summary>
        readonly IEnumerable<T> enumerable;

        /// <summary>
        /// Constructor.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="enumerable">Collection to enumerate. Must not be null.</param>
        public SmartEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
        {
            if (enumerable == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
            }
            this.enumerable = enumerable;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns an enumeration of Entry objects, each of which knows
        /// whether it is the first/last of the enumeration, as well as the
        /// current value and next/previous values.
        /// </summary>
        public IEnumerator<Entry> GetEnumerator()
        {
            using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
            {
                if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
                {
                    yield break;
                }
                bool isFirst = true;
                bool isLast = false;
                int index = 0;
                Entry previous = null;

                T current = enumerator.Current;
                isLast = !enumerator.MoveNext();
                var entry = new Entry(isFirst, isLast, current, index++, previous);                
                isFirst = false;
                previous = entry;

                while (!isLast)
                {
                    T next = enumerator.Current;
                    isLast = !enumerator.MoveNext();
                    var entry2 = new Entry(isFirst, isLast, next, index++, entry);
                    entry.SetNext(entry2);
                    yield return entry;

                    previous.UnsetLinks();
                    previous = entry;
                    entry = entry2;                    
                }

                yield return entry;
                previous.UnsetLinks();
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Non-generic form of GetEnumerator.
        /// </summary>
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Represents each entry returned within a collection,
        /// containing the value and whether it is the first and/or
        /// the last entry in the collection's. enumeration
        /// </summary>
        public class Entry
        {
            #region Fields
            private readonly bool isFirst;
            private readonly bool isLast;
            private readonly T value;
            private readonly int index;
            private Entry previous;
            private Entry next = null;
            #endregion

            #region Properties
            /// <summary>
            /// The value of the entry.
            /// </summary>
            public T Value { get { return value; } }

            /// <summary>
            /// Whether or not this entry is first in the collection's enumeration.
            /// </summary>
            public bool IsFirst { get { return isFirst; } }

            /// <summary>
            /// Whether or not this entry is last in the collection's enumeration.
            /// </summary>
            public bool IsLast { get { return isLast; } }

            /// <summary>
            /// The 0-based index of this entry (i.e. how many entries have been returned before this one)
            /// </summary>
            public int Index { get { return index; } }

            /// <summary>
            /// Returns the previous entry.
            /// Only available for the CURRENT entry!
            /// </summary>
            public Entry Previous { get { return previous; } }

            /// <summary>
            /// Returns the next entry for the current iterator.
            /// Only available for the CURRENT entry!
            /// </summary>
            public Entry Next { get { return next; } }
            #endregion

            #region Constructors
            internal Entry(bool isFirst, bool isLast, T value, int index, Entry previous)
            {
                this.isFirst = isFirst;
                this.isLast = isLast;
                this.value = value;
                this.index = index;
                this.previous = previous;
            }
            #endregion

            #region Methods
            /// <summary>
            /// Fix the link to the next item of the IEnumerable
            /// </summary>
            /// <param name="entry"></param>
            internal void SetNext(Entry entry)
            {
                next = entry;
            }

            /// <summary>
            /// Allow previous and next Entry to be garbage collected by setting them to null
            /// </summary>
            internal void UnsetLinks()
            {
                previous = null;
                next = null;
            }

            /// <summary>
            /// Returns "(index)value"
            /// </summary>
            /// <returns></returns>
            public override string ToString()
            {
                return String.Format("({0}){1}", Index, Value);
            }
            #endregion

        }
    }
}
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What about little simpler approach.

Item last = null;
foreach (Item result in Model.Results)
{
    // do something with each item

    last = result;
}

//Here Item 'last' contains the last object that came in the last of foreach loop.
DoSomethingOnLastElement(last);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why someone down-voted you. This is perfectly acceptable considering you are already performing a foreach and are incurring the cost of o(n). –  arviman Aug 27 at 7:03

You can do like this :

foreach (DataGridViewRow dgr in product_list.Rows)
{
    if (dgr.Index == dgr.DataGridView.RowCount - 1)
    {
        //do something
    }
}
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