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I have:

instance1 = instance2;

how do I disconnect them from one another, so that altering one will not affect the other?

EDIT: I want them referencing the same object (so I can’t clone), and later – not. But I still want both instances of the class – so I can’t ‘null’ them.

Thanks

EDIT:

myclass a = new myclass();
a.integer = 1;

myclass b = new myclass();
b.integer = 2;

a = b;
//All changes to one will affect the other, Which is what I want.



//<More lines of the program>



//Now I want 'a' to point to something else than 'b'. and I’m missing the code
//so that the next line will not affect 'b'.
a.integer = 1;

Text = b.integer.ToString();
//I need b.integer to still be = 2, it’s not.

With:

class myclass
{
    public int integer;
}

EDIT:

This is the answer: @ispiro but when you say a.integer = 1 you aren't changing the pointer, you are following the pointer and changing the value at the end of it. – Davy8

I had thought that changing both ‘a’ and ‘a.integer’ would be the same in the sense that changing them would either change pointer-‘a’ or won’t. But in fact: the first does, the second doesn’t.

Thanks everyone.

So in the example above, if I add:

a = c;// where c is another instance of 'myclass'.

It will change ‘a’ to point somewhere else than ‘b’. But:

a.integer = 1;

did not.

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to do? If you want two instances with the same information clone the object instead of assigning it. – lluismontero Sep 19 '11 at 20:45
4  
I think you're wanting to clone objects instead of refer to the exact same instance: stackoverflow.com/questions/78536/cloning-objects-in-c – NotMe Sep 19 '11 at 20:47
    
These variables aren't "connected" they are just pointing to the same thing. Imagine you were pointing a tree with both your left and right hands. If you stop pointing at the tree with the left hand, you have in no way affected the tree or your right hand. – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 20:48
1  
Can you show a code sample of what "setting" means. Are you saying that changing the object referenced by instance1 won't affect the object referenced by instance2? If so, that is impossible under the constraints you have laid out because they are the same object. – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 21:02
1  
I still don't understand what you actually want to happen. You're giving a lot of code and not always being clear about stating both what actually happens and what you expect/want to happen. – Davy8 Sep 19 '11 at 21:25
up vote 18 down vote accepted

Your code:

myclass a = new myclass();
a.integer = 1;

myclass b = new myclass();
b.integer = 2;

a = b;

//here I need code to disconnect them

a.integer = 1;

Text = b.integer.ToString();
//I need b.integer to still be = 2

enter image description here

If you keep around a reference:

myclass a = new myclass();
a.integer = 1;

myclass b = new myclass();
b.integer = 2;

var c = a; //Keep the old a around
a = b;

//here I need code to disconnect them
a = c; //Restore it.

a.integer = 1;

Text = b.integer.ToString();
//It's still 2 now.

enter image description here

Variables are labels to the objects, not the objects themselves. In your case, the original a no longer has a reference to it so even though it exists, there's no way to access it. (and it'll cease to exist whenever the garbage collector gets around to getting rid of it unless there are other references to it)

If it helps, think of it this way, when you say a = b or a = new myclass() you are moving the line where a is pointing. When you say a.integer = 1, the . is kind of like saying follow the line a is pointing to, then change the destination.

share|improve this answer
    
Try your code. See that it doesn't work. – ispiro Sep 19 '11 at 21:38
    
@ispiro Sorry, edited it, I should be keeping a around not b. Pics coming – Davy8 Sep 19 '11 at 21:44
    
@ispiro see the edit and check if the images help explain what's going on – Davy8 Sep 19 '11 at 21:47
    
This is the best answer here. Clearly a $Temp type variable is needed. – Michael Jasper Sep 19 '11 at 21:56
1  
awsome explanation – vish Aug 24 '15 at 12:21

Suppose you write "1600 Pennsylvania Avenue" on a piece of paper. That address refers to a house, in fact, the White House.

Suppose you write "1600 Pennsylvania Avenue" on a second piece of paper. That address refers to the same house as the first piece of paper.

There is absolutely nothing you can do to alter the fact that those two addresses refer to the same house. You can change one of the pieces of paper to say "123 Sesame Street", and then they no longer refer to the same house, but that isn't changing a fact about The White House, that's changing a fact about a piece of paper.

If you then paint the White House so that it is blue, you still haven't changed anything about either piece of paper; both now refer to a blue house.

Can you explain in more detail what it is that you're trying to do here? Your question is very confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
"You can change one of the pieces of paper to say "123 Sesame Street"." - that is precisely what I'm trying to do. How do I do that in c#? – ispiro Sep 19 '11 at 20:55
    
instance2 = someotherHouseObject; or possibly instance2 = new house("123 Sesame Street"); – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 21:06
1  
Yes. So what's wrong with that? – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 21:25
1  
Somehow I feel like I'm in an argument with my wife here, where logic does not apply and the ground rules change with each exchange. – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 22:04
5  
@JohnFx: I'm not touching that one. – Eric Lippert Sep 19 '11 at 22:06

I think I understand better what you are saying based on your comments.

The answer is very very simple.

This code:

instance1 = instance2;

Does not link instance1 and instance2 in any way other than the fact that they point to the same thing. You can always re-point either variable (including "Nulling" them) without affecting the other. Setting either instance to null doesn't change the object it just makes it stop pointing at the object in memory.

In essence, the premise of the question is inaccurate. There is no problem here to solve.

Key point to understand: The variables instance1 and instance2 just store the location of an object in memory, not the actual object. If you wanted to manipulate the actual object you would use a method or property on that object, for example:

instance1.ChangeColor; // call the ChangeColor method on the object pointed to by instance1.

Update:

Assume a and b are index cards with the address of a mailbox that can hold a number. Here is a play-by-play of what your code is doing

//create a mailbox (call it X)  and write the address on index card A
myclass a = new myclass();  

//put the number 1 in the mailbox at the address written on index card A (currently x)
a.integer = 1;   //mailbox x now contains 1

//create ANOTHER mailbox (call it Y) and write the address on index card B
myclass b = new myclass(); 

//put the number 2 in the mailbox at the address written on index card B (currently Y) 
b.integer = 2;  //mailbox y now contains 2

// change the address on index card A to the address from card B (currently Y)
a = b;  //both cards now have the address of mailbox Y (which contains 2) written on them. 

// if you want a to go back to having the address of mailbox X, you are
// out of luck because you don't have it written down on any of your cards anymore.

//put the number 1 in the mailbox at the address pointed to on Card A (Currently Y)
a.integer = 1;  //mailbox Y now contains 1

//Set text to the number from the mailbox at the address on card B (currently Y)
Text = b.integer.ToString();  
share|improve this answer
1  
Right, then just change it. It WON'T affect the other. That's what half a dozen people are trying to tell you. – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 21:31
3  
@ispiro but when you say a.integer = 1 you aren't changing the pointer, you are following the pointer and changing the value at the end of it. – Davy8 Sep 19 '11 at 22:08
1  
@ispiro - It does because you left out the code to point a to something else. If you insert a line that sets a to anything but b, then changes to a will no longer affect b. Understand that A and B do NOT store the values 1 and 2, they store a link to a place in memory where those values are stored. – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 22:09
1  
@Davy8 I thought I was changing the pointer to a new address and putting a ‘1’ there. This is the answer. – ispiro Sep 19 '11 at 22:12
1  
I think you are starting to see the light. Whenever you see a . after a variable name, the part to the right of the dot is manipulating/reading from the actual object being pointed to. – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 22:14

Write a copy constructor for the class in question, and point one of your references to a new instance that was created via the copy constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no such thing as a "copy constructor" in C#. – Eric Lippert Sep 19 '11 at 20:50
    
This is what I had in mind: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173116(v=vs.80).aspx – jtoberon Sep 19 '11 at 21:04
MyClass instance1 = new MyClass();
MyClass instance2 = new MyClass();

instance1 = instance2;

instance1 = null; //does not affect instance2.
share|improve this answer

It's unclear what you want to do. Clearly, if you set instance1 = null, then the references won't be the same. Are you instead asking how to make a deep copy?

You probably want to look into the ICloneable interface. You have to write code that will copy the properties of one instance into the other.

Alternatively, you can overload the = operator. Or create a constructor that you can call:

MyClass instance2 = new MyClass(instance1);
share|improve this answer
    
See edit to question. – ispiro Sep 19 '11 at 20:54

You need a way to clone your instance (create a replica of an instance).

For example, in your class:

public MyClass(MyClass copy)
{
    // ...copy all attributes, be careful with reference variables
}

Then you can do the following:

instance1 = new MyClass(instance2);

They would both have the exact same attributes and properties (if you implemented your copy constructor correctly), but modifying one wouldn't affect the other.

share|improve this answer

Can your class be a struct instead to cause it to be a value type?

public void Main()
{
    MyObj a = new MyObj{ integer= 1};
    MyObj b = a;

    Console.WriteLine(a.integer); //1
    Console.WriteLine(b.integer);//1

    b.integeter = 42;

    Console.WriteLine(a.integer);//1
    Console.WriteLine(b.integer);//42
}

public struct MyObj
{
    public int integer{get; set;}
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't put bullets in that gun. His shoes have enough holes already. =) – JohnFx Sep 19 '11 at 21:55
    
I need it as a value type at first. – ispiro Sep 19 '11 at 22:09

I would suggest that it is most helpful to think of fields and variables of a class type as holding "instance id's". Some people think of them as pointers, but that's an implementation detail. The essential thing to realize is that if Foo is a variable of class type Bar, the statement "Foo.Boz()" doesn't instruct the compiler to alter Foo in any way; it instructs the compiler to look up the object referred to by the instance id stored in Foo (the object must be of type Bar), and run the Boz method on that object. Very few operations can be done an instance id itself, rather than on the object referred to thereby:

  1. An instance id can be copied from one variable or field to another.
  2. An instance id can be passed by value to a method or property
  3. An instance id can be passed by reference to a method or property
  4. An instance id can be compared with another (without looking at the objects referred to the id's--just the id's themselves)

If Biff and Baff are identical instance id's, actions done to the object referred to by Biff will affect the object referred to by Baff, since they're the same object (but such actions won't actually affect Biff and Baff themselves, which will still hold the same instance id's as before). If one wants Biff to refer to an object which is similar to the one referred to by Baff, but with some difference, then one must create a new object similar to the one referred to by Biff and Baff, store into Biff the id of that new object, and then modify that object so it differs in the desired way from the one pointed to by Baff.

Note, by the way, that in addition to supporting class types, .net also supports value types (e.g. primitives like Integer or Double, as well as structures). Unlike class types, variables and fields of value types are disjoint; changing one will not affect any other. In many cases value types make it easier to isolate data dependencies. It is important to note, however, that while it is useful to be able to make changes to one value-type variable or field without affecting any other, one must, when changing part of a value-type entity (e.g. one field in a structure), be aware that in certain cases, .net will silently make a copy of a value-type entity and then operate on the copy.

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