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I'm looping through certain files (all files starting with MOVIE) in a folder with this bash script code:

for i in MY-FOLDER/MOVIE*
do

which works fine when there are files in the folder. But when there aren't any, it somehow goes on with one file which it thinks is named MY-FOLDER/MOVIE*.

How can I avoid it to enter the things after

do

if there aren't any files in the folder?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
for i in $(find MY-FOLDER/MOVIE -type f); do
  echo $i
done

The find utility is one of the Swiss Army knives of linux. It starts at the directory you give it and finds all files in all subdirectories, according to the options you give it.

-type f will find only regular files (not directories).

As I wrote it, the command will find files in subdirectories as well; you can prevent that by adding -maxdepth 1

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1  
find is swiss army knife, true. but used it such a way with for loop is prone to fail upon files with spaces. –  bash-o-logist Sep 20 '11 at 5:08
    
Additionally, this will split on the echo $i since you left I unquoted. See this for examples of better syntax. –  BroSlow Apr 17 at 15:26

With the nullglob option.

$ shopt -s nullglob
$ for i in zzz* ; do echo "$i" ; done
$ 
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your code works for me even without the nullglob option, what am I doing wrong? –  Denis Golomazov Jun 6 '13 at 6:42
    
@DenisGolomazov: You have files that match. Try using a glob that matches no files. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 6 '13 at 12:50
    
thanks, got it. The result was zzz*. –  Denis Golomazov Jun 7 '13 at 9:35
for file in MY-FOLDER/MOVIE*
do
  # Skip if not a file
  test -f "$file" || continue
  # Now you know it's a file.
  ...
done
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