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suppose you have enum MyEnum {A = 0, B = 1, C = 2, D = 4, E = 8, F = 16};

At some point you have a function that will check an instance of MyEnum and return true if it is C,D, or F

bool IsCDF(MyEnum enumValue) 
{
  return //something slick
}

I remember that there was some really slick way to do bit shifting and preform this operation that read way better than a bunch of ternary if statements but for the life of me I can't remember what it is.

Anyone know?

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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you make it a [Flags] enum, you can assign a different bit value (1, 2, 4, 8, 16...) to each enumerated value. Then you can use a bitwise operation to determine if a value is one of a set of possible values.

So, to see if it is C, D, or F:

bool IsCDF(MyEnum enumValue)
{
    return((enumValue & (MyEnum.C | MyEnum.D | MyEnum.F)) != 0);
}

Note that this will not work for a value of 0 (in your example, 'A'), and you must be careful that all enum values resolve to unique bit values (i.e. non-zero powers of two).

The advantages of this approach are:

  • it will typically take a single CPU instruction to execute, whereas doing three separate "if" checks will take 3 or more instructions (depending on your target platform).
  • You can pass the set of values that you want to test with as an enum value (a single integer) instead of needing to use lists of enum values.
  • You can do lots of other useful things with bitwise operations, which would be clunky and slow with ordinary numerical/comparative approaches.
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Yeah, I pad and paper-ed something similar. I wanted to use this with the BCL's ConnectionState which Sadly does have ConnectionState.Closed = 0 - I could raise everything to a power of two but we're leaving the range of 'being slick' then. –  George Mauer Sep 19 '11 at 22:14
    
Although, if the list I'm checking against does not contain a 0 then it should always evaluate to false anyways... –  George Mauer Sep 19 '11 at 22:19
    
Yep, I am 2 years late - but I would advise against this, because it is dangerous in the long run. Not very readable, not very clean. –  FrankB Jun 6 '13 at 12:27
    
Yes, these says you can use Enum.HasFlag() which is much more readable. –  Jason Williams Jun 6 '13 at 15:47
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bool IsCDF(MyEnum enumValue) 
{
  return new[]{MyEnum.C, MyEnum.D, MyEnum.F}.Contains(enumValue);
}
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I'd possibly use Unconstrained Melody as a way of keeping things tidy:

if (value.HasAny(MyEnum.C | MyEnum.D | MyEnum.E))
{
    ...
}

I'd probably extract the "C, D or E" bit into a named constant - possibly in the enum itself, if it had meaning:

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May be you are thinking of FlagsAttribute. Look at here and here for some examples.

You could use Enum.HasFlag Method

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Enum.HasFlag() tests for all of the flags, not any of the flags. –  Suncat2000 May 2 at 19:35
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return (enumValue & MyEnum.C == MyEnum.C) 
       || (enumValue & MyEnum.D == MyEnum.D) 
       || (enumValue & MyEnum.F == MyEnum.F);
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1  
I don't think the OP is interested in this way of checking it. –  Bala R Sep 19 '11 at 21:52
    
Yeah, this is still basically if statements, just not True/False –  George Mauer Sep 19 '11 at 22:15
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Maybe this extension class is usefull for you:

public static class Flags
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Checks if the type has any flag of value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool HasAny<T>(this System.Enum type, T value)
    {
        try
        {
            return (((int) (object) type & (int) (object) value) != 0);
        }
        catch
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks if the value contains the provided type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool Has<T>(this System.Enum type, T value)
    {
        try
        {
            return (((int)(object)type & (int)(object)value) == (int)(object)value);
        }
        catch
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks if the value is only the provided type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool Is<T>(this System.Enum type, T value)
    {
        try
        {
            return (int)(object)type == (int)(object)value;
        }
        catch
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Appends a value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T Add<T>(this System.Enum type, T value)
    {
        try
        {
            return (T)(object)(((int)(object)type | (int)(object)value));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                string.Format(
                    "Could not append value from enumerated type '{0}'.",
                    typeof(T).Name
                    ), ex);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Appends a value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static void AddTo<T>(this System.Enum type, ref T value)
    {
        try
        {
            value = (T)(object)(((int)(object)type | (int)(object)value));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                string.Format(
                    "Could not append value from enumerated type '{0}'.",
                    typeof(T).Name
                    ), ex);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes the value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T Remove<T>(this System.Enum type, T value)
    {
        try
        {
            return (T)(object)(((int)(object)type & ~(int)(object)value));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                string.Format(
                    "Could not remove value from enumerated type '{0}'.",
                    typeof(T).Name
                    ), ex);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes the value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static void RemoveFrom<T>(this System.Enum type, ref T value)
    {
        try
        {
            value = (T)(object)(((int)(object)type & ~(int)(object)value));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                string.Format(
                    "Could not remove value from enumerated type '{0}'.",
                    typeof(T).Name
                    ), ex);
        }
    }
}
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