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In my app, I have edit text boxes where the user enters a decimal value that the app uses to run a calculation.

Some users in other locales are reporting problems when entering the numbers, like entering a value and a different one appearing. I have tried to fix this by getting the value from the editText with this method:

public double stringToDouble(String s){
        if (nf == null){
            nf = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.US);
        }
        try {
            return nf.parse(s).doubleValue();
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return 0.0;
        }
    }

and

val = stringToDouble(et.getText().toString());

But apparently that still isn't working for some people.

One user in Slovenia reported that it works fine if

  • settings; Language & keyboard :
  • Select language : set to English(Slovenia)
  • Touch input: set only to English and whatever language(my case Slovenia)
  • Bilingual prediction: OFF
  • Text prediction: OFF

What is the correct way to go about fetching the double values? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
is this because some countries use a comma instead of dot for decimals? –  Kevin Qiu Sep 20 '11 at 0:33
    
I think that has something to do with it. But when I use the above double to string method with "2,2" it returns a double with a value of 2.2 so I thought it was working. –  Matt Sep 20 '11 at 2:10
    
see if this helps stackoverflow.com/questions/4323599/… –  Kevin Qiu Sep 20 '11 at 3:29
    
Should the locale be the phone's default locale, instead of Locale.US? The problem is, I have no way of knowing what locale the user will be in so it needs to work in all of them. –  Matt Sep 20 '11 at 5:07
    
developer.android.com/reference/java/util/… this will allow you to know their locale –  Kevin Qiu Sep 20 '11 at 5:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the looks of it, the correct way to do it is:

public double stringToDouble(String s){
        if (nf == null){
            nf = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.getDefault());
        }
        try {
            return nf.parse(s).doubleValue();
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return 0.0;
        }
    }

So far that seems to be working for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Caching your NumberFormat instance is okay as long as stringToDouble() isn't invoked concurrently by multiple threads, as NumberFormat isn't thread-safe. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 26 '11 at 17:44
    
Thanks, I didn't know that. Should I use NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.getDefault()).parse(s).doubleValue(); instead? –  Matt Sep 27 '11 at 20:36
    
Either that (simplest solution, preferred) or synchronizing at least the invocation of nf.parse() on some private final new Object() field (only after it's proven to be a bottleneck). Maybe there's even a number-formatting cousin of Common Lang's thread-safe FastDateFormat out there, but I couldn't find it right now. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 27 '11 at 20:48
    
OK, thanks a lot! –  Matt Sep 28 '11 at 19:13
    
Končno ena varianta, ki deluje! ;-) –  lenooh Oct 5 at 13:18

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