Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically I need to tell apart the following two:

var simple = 5 // or "word", or 56.78, or any other "simple" object
var complex = {propname: "propvalue", "otherprop": "othervalue"}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using typeof operator you can determine the following:

"number"        Operand is a number
"string"        Operand is a string
"boolean"       Operand is a Boolean
"object"        Operand is an object
"undefined"     Operand is not defined.

Edited: As it was suggested in a comment you may want to also check if value is null, as typeof null will return object.

share|improve this answer
4  
Believe it or not, typeof null is 'object'. Crockford has a field day with this... –  Joseph Silber Sep 19 '11 at 22:29

The problem is that more than just {} returns a type of 'object'

typeof 5 == 'number'
typeof NaN == 'number'
typeof 'test' == 'string'
typeof true == 'boolean'
typeof undefined == 'undefined'    

typeof null == 'object'
typeof /asdf/ == 'object' // this is true in some engines, like Firefox's. Not in V8 (in which it is 'function')
typeof [] == 'object'
typeof {} == 'object'

But, by using toString you can check further:

toString.call(null) == '[object Window]' // or '[object global]' or '[object Null]' - depends on engine
toString.call(/asdf/) == '[object RegExp]'
toString.call([]) == '[object Array]'
toString.call({}) == '[object Object]'

So, the best way to check is:

var test;

test = {};
typeof test == 'object' && toString.call(test) == '[object Object]'; // true

test = [];
typeof test == 'object' && toString.call(test) == '[object Object]'; // false

// et cetera

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer

In your case:

var simple = 5; // number, not an object
var simple = new Number(5); // now it is an object, but still the value is 5
var complex = {propname: "propvalue", "otherprop": "othervalue"};

for ( property in complex ) {
   if ( complex.hasOwnProperty( property ) )
   {
      alert ( 'composite object' );
      return;
   } else {
      alert ( 'simple object' );
      return;
   }
}

As of what I understand from you question - you need to tell if the object has properties/methods.

share|improve this answer

Credit here

Object.prototype.getName = function() { 
   var funcNameRegex = /function (.{1,})\(/;
   var results = (funcNameRegex).exec((this).constructor.toString());
   return (results && results.length > 1) ? results[1] : "";
};


var simple  = 5;            // or "word", or 56.78, or any other "simple" object
var complex = { propname    : "propvalue"
              , "otherprop" : "othervalue"
              };

simple.getName();           // returns: "Number"
complex.getName();          // returns: "Object"
share|improve this answer

You could use typeof:

typeof 5 == "number";
typeof 1.5 == "number";
typeof true == "boolean";
typeof "word" == "string";
typeof {} == "object";

Basically:

if(obj == null) {
  //null or undefined
}
else if(typeof obj == "object") {
  //It's "complex"
}
else {
  //Primitive or "simple"
}

Note: null will return "object", so you need to check for it.

share|improve this answer

Try the following

if (typeof obj === 'object') {
  // It's complex
} else {
  // It's not
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.