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Am I doing something wrong, or is the following code really not possible?

dynamic x = new ExpandoObject { Foo = 12, Bar = "twelve" };

If this really isn't possible, is there another one-line way to instantiate an ExpandoObject with two properties?

Why would the C# team opt to disallow the same initialization syntax as for regular objects, anonymous objects, and enumerables/lists?

Update

I asked this question because I was trying show a Pearl enthusiast the cool new dynamic features of C#, but then I was stalled by not being able to do what I thought was a logical instantiation of an ExpandoObject. Thanks to Hans Passant's answer, I realize that ExpandoObject was the wrong tool for the job. My real goal was to use the dynamic features of C# to return two named values from a method. As Hans points out, the dynamic keyword is perfect for this. I didn't need an ExpandoObject, with all its overhead, to do this.

So, if you want to return a pair of named values from a method, and you are not concerned about type safety, Intellisense, refactoring, or performance, this works quite nicely:

public dynamic CreateFooBar()
{
    return new { Foo = 42, Bar = "Hello" };
}

Usage:

dynamic fooBar = CreateFooBar();
var foo = fooBar.Foo;
var bar = fooBar.Bar;
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5  
Watch out! The example in your update would only work within the same assembly, since the generated anonymous type is internal. –  configurator Sep 27 '11 at 15:59
    
@configurator, thanks, good point. –  devuxer Sep 27 '11 at 17:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Am I doing something wrong, or is the following code really not possible?

It's really not possible. The thing on the left of the assignment operator has to be a property or field known at compile time, and obviously that is not the case for expando objects.

Why would the C# team opt to disallow the same initialization syntax as for regular objects, anonymous objects, and enumerables/lists?

The way you phrase the question indicates the logical error. Features are not implemented by default and then we run around disallowing almost all of them because we think they're a bad idea! Features are unimplemented by default, and have to be implemented in order to work.

The first step in implementing any feature is that someone has to think of it in the first place. To my knowledge, we never did. In particular, it would have been quite difficult for the person designing object initializers in 2006 to know that in 2010 we were going to add "dynamic" to the language, and design the feature accordingly. Features are always designed by designers who move forwards in time, not backwards in time. We only remember the past, not the future.

Anyway, it's a nice idea so thanks for sharing it. Now that someone has thought of it, we can then work on the next steps, like deciding if it is the best idea upon which we can spend our limited budget, designing it, writing the specification, implementing it, testing it, documenting it and shipping it to customers.

I wouldn't expect any of that to happen any time soon; we're a bit busy with this whole async-and-WinRT business that we announced at Build last week.

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5  
n00bs, can't remember the future. :-) jk, +1 –  Mehrdad Sep 19 '11 at 22:37
4  
Sorry, Eric, I didn't mean to sound attacking. I was just trying to show off to a coworker, who is a python enthusiast, the cool new dynamic features of C#, but then I was stalled by not being able to do what I thought was a logical instantiation of an ExpandoObject. In any case, thanks for your answer, and I hope you'll consider this feature when things settle down with async and WinRT. –  devuxer Sep 19 '11 at 22:41
    
I'm going to mark this as the answer because it's technically better for the exact question I asked, but I want to mention that Hans' answer better addressed my underlying question, which was, How do you use the dynamic features of C# to return two named values at a time from a method? As Hans points out, you can just use dyanmic--ExpandoObject seems to be intended for more complex scenarios (such as constructing a class at runtime based on the contents of an XML file). So, now that I understand this, I'm no longer as surprised that ExpandoObject doesn't support object initializers. –  devuxer Sep 20 '11 at 20:31
    
"The thing on the left of the assignment operator has to be a property or field known at compile time, and obviously that is not the case for expando objects." - I'm not quite sure what you mean there... –  configurator Sep 27 '11 at 16:00

There's a better mouse trap than ExpandoObject. The dynamic keyword handles anonymous types with aplomb:

class Program {      
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        dynamic x = new { Foo = 12, Bar = "twelve" };
        Display(x);
    }
    static void Display(dynamic x) {
        Console.WriteLine(x.Foo);
        Console.WriteLine(x.Bar);
    }
}

One unfortunate problem is that the C# compiler generates the anonymous type giving the members only internal accessibility. Which means that you'll get a runtime error when you try to access the members in another assembly. Bummer.

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1  
+1. This is great, Hans. Thanks. I didn't realize you could use dynamic as a return type, but it appears that you can. So, I didn't even need ExpandoObject for my particular scenario. –  devuxer Sep 20 '11 at 4:44
5  
Just know you have to be careful passing anonymous types out side of your method, they can't cross assembly boundaries. –  jbtule Sep 21 '11 at 2:03

Dynamitey (open source PCL and found in nuget) has a syntax for initializing expandos that can be inline.

 //using Dynamitey.DynamicObjects
 var x = Build<ExpandoObject>.NewObject(Foo:12, Bar:"twelve");
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How would this be possible, are Foo and Bar parameter names? –  nawfal Jul 17 at 22:18
    
Yes, parameter names are send with the dlr call. So my build object proxy, converts parameter names to property setter calls. –  jbtule Jul 18 at 14:04
    
An ExpandoObject is a dynamic prototype object, it's just like an object in Javascript, you add properties dynamically, they are never predefined. –  jbtule Jul 18 at 17:50
    
This was the winner for me. I'm sure annoyed I have to jump through these hoops when all i wanted to do was View(new { Items = model } ) –  Chris Marisic Jul 29 at 20:53

That kind of initializer syntax is possible because there are already property with a get and setter. With the expando object there aren't those properties yet from what I can tell.

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