Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any methods to remove a line of code from a Release build, but leave it in the Debug build without ugly #if statements?

For example, is there some way to achieve the equivalent of the below code without using all these if statements?

#if DEBUG
    Log.Log("I am in debug mode");
#endif

If I have a conditional, run-time check in the Log.Log function, then the string "I am in debug mode" will be preserved within my compiled executable, which is exactly what I do not want.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Define another macro in a common, shared header.

#ifdef DEBUG
#define LOG(m) Log.Log(m);
#else
#define LOG(m) do {} while(false);
#endif

Then replace your calls to Log.Log with LOG.

share|improve this answer
    
You may want to make the second define (the release version) be: do {} while(false) to properly deal with semi-colons people would be likely to add after this call. consider:if (foo) LOG(m) important_call() –  Arvid Sep 19 '11 at 23:27
    
@Arvid - adjusted –  Daniel A. White Sep 19 '11 at 23:33

Have your Log.Log function #ifdef'd based on the build. So in DEBUG, it logs stuff, and in RELEASE, it's a no-op. For example:

namespace Log
{
  void Log()
  {
  #if DEBUG
    //Insert logging code here.
  #endif
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
One small issue with this approach is that you still pay a minor performance penalty for calling the Log() function at all, even if that function did nothing. Using a macro-centric approach let's non-Debug builds literally do nothing instead. –  adpalumbo Sep 19 '11 at 23:23
    
@adpalumbo: That assumes that the compiler/linker can't figure out that the function does nothing. Compilers tend to have some form of global optimizations these days, so they can optimize them out completely. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 19 '11 at 23:26
    
It would take a pretty advanced compiler to optimize it to that extent across compilation units. It's possible that some do this, but I wouldn't rely on it. That said, the penalty for doing what you suggest is often trivial in everyday use, and there's something to be had for just having clean C++ code instead of playing games with the preprocessor. –  adpalumbo Sep 19 '11 at 23:29

You'll ultimately need a preprocessor conditional somewhere, but you could apply it "upstream" in some shared header if you want to keep your application code clean. In that case, you'd have something like

#if DEBUG
   #define DebugLog(m) Log.Log(m);
#else
   #define DebugLog(m)
#endif

in the header associated with Log, and instead of calling Log.Log(m) inside a preprocessor conditional in your application code, you'd just call DebugLog(m). In a Debug build, the macro would expand to Log.Log(m), but otherwise it would just disappear entirely.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.