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I'm trying to figure out how to have SQLAlchemy classes spread across several files, and I can for my life not figure out how to do it. I am pretty new to SQLAlchemy so forgive me if this question is trivial..

Consider these 3 classes in each their own file:

A.py:

from sqlalchemy import *
from main import Base

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = "A"
    id  = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    Bs  = relationship("B", backref="A.id")
    Cs  = relationship("C", backref="A.id")

B.py:

from sqlalchemy import *
from main import Base

class B(Base):
    __tablename__ = "B"
    id    = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    A_id  = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("A.id"))

C.py:

from sqlalchemy import *
from main import Base

class C(Base):
    __tablename__ = "C"    
    id    = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    A_id  = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("A.id"))

And then say we have a main.py something like this:

from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship, backref, sessionmaker

Base = declarative_base()

import A
import B
import C

engine = create_engine("sqlite:///test.db")
Base.metadata.create_all(engine, checkfirst=True)
Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
session = Session()

a  = A.A()
b1 = B.B()
b2 = B.B()
c1 = C.C()
c2 = C.C()

a.Bs.append(b1)
a.Bs.append(b2)    
a.Cs.append(c1)
a.Cs.append(c2)    
session.add(a)
session.commit()

The above gives the error:

sqlalchemy.exc.NoReferencedTableError: Foreign key assocated with column 'C.A_id' could not find table 'A' with which to generate a foreign key to target column 'id'

How do I share the declarative base across these files?

What is the "the right" way to accomplish this, considering that I might throw something like Pylons or Turbogears on top of this?

edit 10-03-2011

I found this description from the Pyramids framework which describes the problem and more importantly verifies that this is an actual issue and not (only) just my confused self that's the problem. Hope it can help others who dares down this dangerous road :)

share|improve this question
1  
What part of the Python import statement confuses you? –  S.Lott Sep 19 '11 at 23:17
1  
@S.Lott The above works if all classes are in one file, so you tell me :) –  joveha Sep 19 '11 at 23:35
    
Your code doesn't give this error, please post the code which has the actual error. Fix your imports, make it run so someone can actually see your error. –  knitti Sep 19 '11 at 23:52
    
"How do I share the declarative base across these files?" Again, I'll ask. "What part of the Python import statement confuses you?" Can you provide a specific question on why import isn't working? Can you provide specific reasons why import is not working? Or do we have to guess what confuses you about import? The "you tell me" is impossible. We don't know what confuses you. Please give us a hint. –  S.Lott Sep 20 '11 at 0:21
4  
He gave you the code and the exception; what else do you need, a tiara? –  IfLoop Sep 20 '11 at 14:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The simplest solution to your problem will be to take Base out of the module that imports A, B and C; Break the cyclic import.

base.py

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
Base = declarative_base()

a.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = "A"
    id  = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    Bs  = relationship("B", backref="A.id")
    Cs  = relationship("C", backref="A.id")

b.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base

class B(Base):
    __tablename__ = "B"
    id    = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    A_id  = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("A.id"))

c.py

from sqlalchemy import *
from base import Base

class C(Base):
    __tablename__ = "C"    
    id    = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    A_id  = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("A.id"))

main.py

from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy.orm import relationship, backref, sessionmaker

import base


import a
import b
import c

engine = create_engine("sqlite:///:memory:")
base.Base.metadata.create_all(engine, checkfirst=True)
Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
session = Session()

a1 = a.A()
b1 = b.B()
b2 = b.B()
c1 = c.C()
c2 = c.C()

a1.Bs.append(b1)
a1.Bs.append(b2)    
a1.Cs.append(c1)
a1.Cs.append(c2)    
session.add(a1)
session.commit()

Works on my machine:

$ python main.py ; echo $?
0
share|improve this answer
    
Use scoped_session. –  user Sep 6 '13 at 7:16
1  
@user: session handling is unrelated to the question in this post, which is really a plain old python question (how do i import stuff?); but since i've got your attention, I would advise strongly against using scoped_session, unless you know why you need thread local storage; The problem with using scoped_session is that it makes it all to easy to wind up with leaked transactions and stale data, with no explicit link to the point in your code when that might have happened. –  IfLoop Sep 6 '13 at 12:01
    
This design pattern doesn't seem to work for python3. Is there any easy fix that is python3 compatible? –  computermacgyver Oct 27 '13 at 10:49
    
@computermacgyver: this pattern should work correctly across python versions. Please ask a new question, so that you can include all of your code, and the errors you are seeing. –  IfLoop Oct 27 '13 at 19:26
    
Thanks @dequestarmappartialsetattr . I found the error only happens when I tried to put a.py, b.py, c.py, and model.py into a separate module. I found the solution in that case was to include the base.py code in the module's __init__.py file instead. I've put the code and more explanation here. Thanks for the reply. –  computermacgyver Oct 28 '13 at 20:57

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