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I'm trying to display two images side to side, with text, controls and whatever else my heart desires over them. To do this, I have the following:

<div>
    <div id="leftDiv" style="float:left; width:49%; height:400px; background-color:transparent">
        <div style="position:relative; left:61px; top:100px; width: 319px; z-index:1">This is text</div>
        <div style="position:relative; left:61px; top:100px; width: 319px; z-index:1">This is also text</div>
        <img id="leftImg" alt="Images/redbox.png"
            style="width:100%; height:100%; z-index:-1; right: 1124px; top: 9px;" 
            src="Images/redbox.png" />

    </div>
    <div id="rightDiv" style="float:left; width:49%; height:400px; background-color:transparent">
        <img id="rightImg" src="Images/bluebox.png" alt="Images/bluebox.png" style="width:100%;height:100%; z-index:-1;" />
    </div>
</div>

This is all great except for one little thing... The left div, the "redbox.png" is always scooted down by the number of s I want inside it (or any place taken by the elements). I could place the elements after the image, but it's really easier to place them where I want this way, and to keep them in place when I animate the boxes.

Now, why am I using images instead of background-img? Well I want the images to resize to the surrounding <div>s automatically, and this is the only way I found of doing it easily (resizing manually with javascript is an option, but a complicated one at that, since the boxes will be animated).

Any ideas? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should use position:absolute rather than position:relative in order to take the element out of flow. You will need to adjust the left and top attributes, however.

http://jsfiddle.net/3fJcR/1/

<div>
    <div id="leftDiv" style="float:left; width:49%; height:400px; background-color:transparent; position: relative">
        <div style="position:absolute; left:61px; top:50px; width: 319px; z-index:1">This is text</div>
        <div style="position:absolute; left:61px; top:64px; width: 319px; z-index:1">This is also text</div>
        <img id="leftImg" alt="Images/redbox.png"
            style="width:100%; height:100%; z-index:-1; right: 1124px; top: 9px;" 
            src="Images/redbox.png" />

    </div>
    <div id="rightDiv" style="float:left; width:49%; height:400px; background-color:transparent; position: relative">
        <img id="rightImg" src="Images/bluebox.png" alt="Images/bluebox.png" style="width:100%;height:100%; z-index:-1;" />
    </div>
</div>
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thing is that the content is gonna undergo many animations and if I use an absolute positioning, it wont stay where I want it to... –  David Menard Sep 20 '11 at 0:01
1  
hm... I can't think of any other way to take an element out of flow :( –  Joseph Marikle Sep 20 '11 at 0:08
2  
@David Make the parent div position: relative and the children position: absolute. This will keep the children absolute WITHIN the position relative parent. (parents being leftDiv and rightDiv?) –  James Khoury Sep 20 '11 at 0:41
    
@Joseph I took the liberty of editing your post to include the new code. –  James Khoury Sep 20 '11 at 0:46
    
Oh wow. good catch, @JamesKhoury. I didn't even notice the parent wasn't position:relative. Yes, making the parent position:relative will not affect its position (provided you leave top: left: etc. alone) and will isolate position:absolute children to its boundaries. –  Joseph Marikle Sep 20 '11 at 0:46

You can have position:absolute for your wrapping div and position:absolute for inner overlay too. Then the inner absolute is relative to outer absolute positioned element not the body.

Look at this example to see what I'm saying:

http://jsfiddle.net/mohsen/TbkjK/7/

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@Mohesen Coffee is spelt with two e's ;). I don't think he needs the wrapping divs to be position absolute as this would take them out of flow with the rest of the document. Then the other parts of the site wouldn't work with it. –  James Khoury Sep 20 '11 at 1:19

For writing text over image you put image in background style and alt text like this-

<img scr="" alt="text"/>

<style>
.img{background-image:url('IMAGE_URL'); }
</style>
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