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Normally I can do something like this to fill up the byte array with stream data:

byte[] dataLength = new byte[4];

clientStream.Read(dataLength, 0, dataLength.Length);

And that fills up the byte array.. However, I've been experimenting with async calls and my code looks like this:

byte[] dataLength = new byte[4];

clientStream.BeginRead(dataLength, 0, dataLength.Length, Read, clientStream);

private void Read(IAsyncResult async)
{
    NetworkStream clientStream = (NetworkStream)async.AsyncState;

    clientStream.EndRead(async);

    byte[] dataLength = new byte[4]; // ..?

    clientStream.Read(dataLength, 0, dataLength.Length); // Have to re-read in data with synchronous version?..

    int result = BitConverter.ToInt32(dataLength, 0);
}

Which I feel is completely.. wrong. What is the point of the async call if you just have to read it all over again in the callback synchronously? How can I access the already read-in bytes without making the dataLength a member variable of the class? Obviously I don't want to do that because there is more than one connection and they all have different values..

I feel like I'm missing something obvious here..

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You do not have to read it all over again - when you call

clientStream.EndRead(async);

it returns the number of bytes that have been read, so you will want to do:

int bytesRead = clientStream.EndRead(async);

At this point your buffer has been filled with those bytes, reading from the stream in a synchronous fashion would just read more bytes.

If you do not want to make your buffer an instance variable you could use a closure with a delegate instead:

byte[] buffer = new byte[4];
clientStream.BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length, (IAsyncResult async) =>
{
    int bytesRead = clientStream.EndRead(async);
    if (bytesRead == 4)
    {
        int result = BitConverter.ToInt32(buffer, 0);
        //..
    }
}, clientStream);

Edit:

A better solution might be to put all the state in form of a custom class and pass it in BeginRead():

public class StreamState
{
    public byte[] Buffer { get; set; }
    public NetworkStream Stream { get; set; }
}

clientStream.BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length, Read, new StreamState { Buffer = buffer, Stream = clientStream });


private void Read(IAsyncResult async)
{
    StreamState state = (StreamState) async.AsyncState;
    int bytesRead = state.Stream.EndRead(async);
    if (bytesRead == 4)
    {
        int result = BitConverter.ToInt32(state.Buffer, 0);
        //..
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the good answer. However, what do you mean by "if you don't want to make your buffer an instance variable"? If I have more than one connection at a time wouldn't an instance variable not work? You speak as if it were possible? Also, is there any way to do it without a closure? It'd be nice to be able to place that closure code in to a separate function. –  John Smith Sep 20 '11 at 3:11
    
Also, if using a closure like this why even pass in clientStream as the last argument for the object data and cast it back to the NetworkStream? Why not just directly access the clientStream since it is in scope? I notice that after you do this (NetworkStream)async.AsyncState you never even used that variable so why even pass it? –  John Smith Sep 20 '11 at 3:13
    
@John Smith: Yes that was an oversight - edited answer and added a solution that should work out better (custom state object) –  BrokenGlass Sep 20 '11 at 3:27
    
BrokenGlass: Thanks for the update. Still wondering though, is this what always does when they have to access the bytes from within the callback? Seems like a pretty common thing to have to do.. is this really the best way? –  John Smith Sep 20 '11 at 4:29

There don't appear to be full examples on MSDN (that I could find, NetworkStream.EndRead has some code though http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.sockets.networkstream.endread(v=VS.90).aspx).

This tutorial has a full example though: http://www.switchonthecode.com/tutorials/csharp-tutorial-asynchronous-stream-operations

In short though, after you've called clientStream.EndRead, your original buffer dataLength should have been populated with the number of bytes returned by EndRead.

Also, I haven't tested it, but I would have though the subsequent call to Read would read in the next 4 bytes of the stream.

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