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Unfortunatly, i can't find the original project which led me to this question. That would have perhaps given this question a bit more context.

EDIT: I found the original project i've seen this in: http://mews.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/63120#1054567 with a concrete implementation at: http://mews.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/63120#1054606

Lets say i have an abstract class with a concrete implementation that does something usefull like:

abstract class AbstractClass
{
    public virtual int ConvertNumber(string number)
    {
        string preparedNumber = Prepare(number);
        int result = StringToInt32(number);
        return result;
    }

    protected abstract string Prepare(string number);

    protected virtual int StringToInt32(string number)
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(number);
    }
}

sealed class ConcreteClass : AbstractClass
{
    protected override string Prepare(string number)
    {
        return number.Trim();
    }

    public override int ConvertNumber(string number)
    {
        return base.ConvertNumber(number);
    }
}

This is as basic as it gets. Now in the code i've seen on the web the author implemented inheritence by inheriting the Abstract class from the most derived type, e.g:

abstract class AbstractGenericClass<TGenericClass>
    where TGenericClass : AbstractGenericClass<TGenericClass>
{
    public virtual int ConvertNumber(string number)
    {
        string preparedNumber = Prepare(number);
        int result = StringToInt32(number);
        return result;
    }

    protected abstract string Prepare(string number);

    protected int StringToInt32(string number)
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(number);
    }
}

sealed class ConcreteGenericClass : AbstractGenericClass<ConcreteGenericClass>
{
    protected override string Prepare(string number)
    {
        return number.Trim();
    }

    public override int ConvertNumber(string number)
    {
        return base.ConvertNumber(number);
    }
}

Now why would one do such a thing? I very vaguely remember this was a technique heavily used in ATL for performance reasons (some way of calling concrete member implementations without working with a vtable?) I'm not very sure on this part.

I've checked the generated IL for both cases and they are exactly the same.

Who can explain this to me?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think your first section of code compiles. public override int ConvertNumber(string number) but there is no such method to override in the base type. –  Danny Chen Sep 20 '11 at 5:04
    
I am guessing to not be done like this? pastebin.com/BgpuKYb7 –  zenwalker Sep 20 '11 at 5:12
1  
@DannyChen: your right, i've changed the code a bit for markup, i've fixed it now. The question still stands –  Polity Sep 20 '11 at 5:23
    
@zenwalker: Thats right –  Polity Sep 20 '11 at 5:37
1  
Well yea thats true, but again i am in confusion like you as why would any body do that. Whats the use or where its used. I hope some 1 will answer soon. –  zenwalker Sep 20 '11 at 5:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That is a C# version of what is called the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern in C++. It is a bit weird, and personally, I try to avoid it. It is useful, but I find it more confusing than useful.

See my article for details:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/03/curiouser-and-curiouser.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Eric! This was really messing with my brain. Luckily your article explained it loud and clear. –  Polity Sep 20 '11 at 6:18
1  
@Eric Lippert - I tend to like this pattern to allow the ancestor class to have members that can use/return instances of descendant classes. I expected the OP's example code to have such a method or property. Nevertheless, the only downside is that you can break the pattern if, for example, class X : AbstractGenericClass<Y> and you have class Y : AbstractGenericClass<Y>. I would love C# to have a "this" constraint to prevent this - i.e. abstract class A<T> where T : this, A<T> - as soon as you declare a concrete class then the generic parameter must be itself. nudge nudge Eric. –  Enigmativity Sep 20 '11 at 6:54
    
@Enigmativity: Indeed, I discuss the shortcoming you identify in the article I linked to. You really need a "thistype" construct to make the pattern work. You can do that sort of thing in Haskell but not in C#; doing so would require some pretty major work to the CLR type system, so it's unlikely to happen any time soon. –  Eric Lippert Sep 20 '11 at 14:11
    
@Enigmativity: I think the "feature" would be much easier without a generic type parameter involved. Think about it: the compiler already knows what it is when you define a subclass, so you shouldn't need to define it. Maybe just a new kind of keyword that would indicate the self-type inside an abstract class or interface. It could be This. Now, it would be interesting to add constraints to it, something like this: interface IInterface where this : IAnother. Only classes that implement IAnother can implement IInterface. No generic parameters and arguments involved. –  Jordão Sep 25 '11 at 2:23

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