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I read the C++ version of this question but didn't really understand it.

Can someone please explain clearly if it can be done and how?

share|improve this question
    
You mean return multiple values? – Michael Myers Apr 14 '09 at 15:12
    
maybe you should link to the other question so we know better what you are askingl. – JohnFx Apr 14 '09 at 15:16
    
I linked it, although I can't be absolutely certain that I linked the right question. – Michael Myers Apr 14 '09 at 15:17
2  
NOTE: Use of Tuple<T> is valid from Framework 4.0 and above – SHEKHAR SHETE Sep 20 '13 at 6:26

19 Answers 19

up vote 239 down vote accepted

Use .NET 4.0+'s Tuple:

For Example:

public Tuple<int, int> GetMultipleValue()
{
     return Tuple.Create(1,2);
}
share|improve this answer
4  
nice trick but I still see One value. – BlaShadow Jul 17 '13 at 5:14
18  
Tuples with two values have Item1 and Item2 as properties. – Arve Systad Nov 11 '13 at 12:00
    
Really helped me out. Thanks. – SearchForKnowledge Mar 30 '15 at 14:55
    
@BlaShadow: I see two values: 1 and 2 – Bigjim Jun 10 '15 at 8:44
    
This is freaking awesome..!! – SiD Nov 2 '15 at 13:21

You cannot do this in C#. What you can do is have a out parameter or return your own class (or struct if you want it to be immutable).

Using out parameter
public int GetDay(DateTime date, out string name)
{
  // ...
}
Using custom class (or struct)
public DayOfWeek GetDay(DateTime date)
{
  // ...
}

public class DayOfWeek
{
  public int Day { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
17  
An alternative in this case is to use a struct instead of a class for the return type. If the return value is stateless and transient, struct is a better choice. – Michael Meadows Apr 14 '09 at 15:44
    
This is not possible with async methods. Tuple is the way to go. (I use out parameters in synchronous operations though; they are indeed useful in those cases.) – Codefun64 Nov 1 '15 at 21:02

If you mean returning multiple values, you can either return a class/struct containing the values you want to return, or use the "out" keyword on your parameters, like so:

public void Foo(int input, out int output1, out string output2, out string errors) {
    // set out parameters inside function
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think it good to use "out" or "ref"——because it can be totally substituted by a returned-value of your own class type. you see, if using "ref", how to assign to such parameters? (It just depends on how to code inside). If in the body of the function, the author has "newed" an instance to the parameter with "ref", this means you can just pass a "nullable" value there. Otherwises not. So that's a little ambigent. And we have better ways (1. Returning your owned class, 2. Turple). – user3230210 Apr 23 '14 at 6:54

Previous poster is right. You cannot return multiple values from a C# method. However, you do have a couple of options:

  • Return a structure that contains multiple members
  • Return an instance of a class
  • Use output parameters (using the out or ref keywords)
  • Use a dictionary or key-value pair as output

The pros and cons here are often hard to figure out. If you return a structure, make sure it's small because structs are value type and passed on the stack. If you return an instance of a class, there are some design patterns here that you might want to use to avoid causing problems - members of classes can be modified because C# passes objects by reference (you don't have ByVal like you did in VB).

Finally you can use output parameters but I would limit the use of this to scenarios when you only have a couple (like 3 or less) of parameters - otherwise things get ugly and hard to maintain. Also, the use of output parameters can be an inhibitor to agility because your method signature will have to change every time you need to add something to the return value whereas returning a struct or class instance you can add members without modifying the method signature.

From an architectural standpoint I would recommend against using key-value pairs or dictionaries. I find this style of coding requires "secret knowledge" in code that consumes the method. It must know ahead of time what the keys are going to be and what the values mean and if the developer working on the internal implementation changes the way the dictionary or KVP is created, it could easily create a failure cascade throughout the entire application.

share|improve this answer
    
And you can also throw an Exception if the second value you want to return is disjunctive from the first one: like when you want to return either a kind of successful value, or a kind of unsuccessful value. – Cœur Jun 16 '14 at 8:40

You either return a class instance our use out parameters. Here's an example of out parameters:

void mymethod(out int param1, out int param2)
{
    param1 = 10;
    param2 = 20;
}

Call it like this:

int i, j;
mymethod(out i, out j);
// i will be 20 and j will be 10
share|improve this answer
    
Ohh so dont use a function? – Ash Apr 14 '09 at 15:19
3  
Remember, though that just because you can, doesn't mean you should do this. This is widely accepted as a bad practice in .Net in most cases. – Michael Meadows Apr 14 '09 at 15:21
3  
Can you elaborate why is this a bad practise? – Zo Has Jan 28 '13 at 7:13
    
It's a bad practice in C/C++. The problem is "programming by side effect": int GetLength(char *s) { int n = 0; while (s[n] != '\0') n++; s[1] = 'X'; return (n); } int main() { char greeting[5] = { 'H', 'e', 'l', 'p', '\0' }; int len = GetLength(greeting); cout << len << ": " << greeting; // Output: 5: HXlp } In C# you would have to write: int len = GetLength(ref greeting) Which would signal a big warning flag of "Hey, greeting is not going to be the same after you call this" and greatly reduce bugs. – Dustin_00 Oct 11 '15 at 4:54

You can use three different ways

1. ref / out parameters

using ref:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 10;
    int b = 20;
    int add = 0;
    int multiply = 0;
    Add_Multiply(a, b, ref add, ref multiply);
    Console.WriteLine(add);
    Console.WriteLine(multiply);
}

private static void Add_Multiply(int a, int b, ref int add, ref int multiply)
{
    add = a + b;
    multiply = a * b;
}

using out:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 10;
    int b = 20;
    int add;
    int multiply;
    Add_Multiply(a, b, out add, out multiply);
    Console.WriteLine(add);
    Console.WriteLine(multiply);
}

private static void Add_Multiply(int a, int b, out int add, out int multiply)
{
    add = a + b;
    multiply = a * b;
}

2. struct / class

using struct:

struct Result
{
    public int add;
    public int multiply;
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 10;
    int b = 20;
    var result = Add_Multiply(a, b);
    Console.WriteLine(result.add);
    Console.WriteLine(result.multiply);
}

private static Result Add_Multiply(int a, int b)
{
    var result = new Result
    {
        add = a * b,
        multiply = a + b
    };
    return result;
}

using class:

class Result
{
    public int add;
    public int multiply;
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 10;
    int b = 20;
    var result = Add_Multiply(a, b);
    Console.WriteLine(result.add);
    Console.WriteLine(result.multiply);
}

private static Result Add_Multiply(int a, int b)
{
    var result = new Result
    {
        add = a * b,
        multiply = a + b
    };
    return result;
}

3. Tuple

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 10;
    int b = 20;
    var result = Add_Multiply(a, b);
    Console.WriteLine(result.Item1);
    Console.WriteLine(result.Item2);
}

private static Tuple<int, int> Add_Multiply(int a, int b)
{
    var tuple = new Tuple<int, int>(a + b, a * b);
    return tuple;
}
share|improve this answer

No, you can't return multiple values from a function in C#, at least not in the way you can do it in Python.

However, there are a couple alternatives:

You can return an array of type object with the multiple values you want in it.

private object[] DoSomething()
{
    return new [] { 'value1', 'value2', 3 };
}

You can use out parameters.

private string DoSomething(out string outparam1, out int outparam2)
{
    outparam1 = 'value2';
    outparam2 = 3;
    return 'value1';
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for 'array of type object.' – John Jesus Feb 19 '14 at 11:43

There are several ways to do this. You can use ref parameters:

int Foo(ref Bar bar) { }

This passes a reference to the function thereby allowing the function to modify the object in the calling code's stack. While this is not technically a "returned" value it is a way to have a function do something similar. In the code above the function would return an int and (potentially) modify bar.

Another similar approach is to use an out parameter. An out parameter is identical to a ref parameter with an additional, compiler enforced rule. This rule is that if you pass an out parameter into a function, that function is required to set its value prior to returning. Besides that rule, an out parameter works just like a ref parameter.

The final approach (and the best in most cases) is to create a type that encapsulates both values and allow the function to return that:

class FooBar 
{
    public int i { get; set; }
    public Bar b { get; set; }
}

FooBar Foo(Bar bar) { }

This final approach is simpler and easier to read and understand.

share|improve this answer

In C# 4, you will be able to use built-in support for tuples to handle this easily.

In the meantime, there are two options.

First, you can use ref or out parameters to assign values to your parameters, which get passed back to the calling routine.

This looks like:

void myFunction(ref int setMe, out int youMustSetMe);

Second, you can wrap up your return values into a structure or class, and pass them back as members of that structure. KeyValuePair works well for 2 - for more than 2 you would need a custom class or struct.

share|improve this answer

Mainly two methods are there. 1. Use out/ref parameters 2. Return an Array of objects

share|improve this answer

you can try this "KeyValuePair"

private KeyValuePair<int, int> GetNumbers()
{
  return new KeyValuePair<int, int>(1, 2);
}


var numbers = GetNumbers();

Console.WriteLine("Output : {0}, {1}",numbers.Key, numbers.Value);

Output :

Output : 1, 2

share|improve this answer

Classes, Structures, Collections and Arrays can contain multiple values. Output and reference parameters can also be set in a function. Return multiple values is possible in dynamic and functional languages by means of tuples, but not in C#.

share|improve this answer

Here are basic Two methods:

1) Use of 'out' as parameter You can use 'out' for both 4.0 and minor versions too.

Example of 'out':

using System;

namespace out_parameter
{
  class Program
   {
     //Accept two input parameter and returns two out value
     public static void rect(int len, int width, out int area, out int perimeter)
      {
        area = len * width;
        perimeter = 2 * (len + width);
      }
     static void Main(string[] args)
      {
        int area, perimeter;
        // passing two parameter and getting two returning value
        Program.rect(5, 4, out area, out perimeter);
        Console.WriteLine("Area of Rectangle is {0}\t",area);
        Console.WriteLine("Perimeter of Rectangle is {0}\t", perimeter);
        Console.ReadLine();
      }
   }
}

Output:

Area of Rectangle is 20

Perimeter of Rectangle is 18

*Note:*The out-keyword describes parameters whose actual variable locations are copied onto the stack of the called method, where those same locations can be rewritten. This means that the calling method will access the changed parameter.

2) Tuple<T>

Example of Tuple:

Returning Multiple DataType values using Tuple<T>

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    // Create four-item tuple; use var implicit type.
    var tuple = new Tuple<string, string[], int, int[]>("perl",
        new string[] { "java", "c#" },
        1,
        new int[] { 2, 3 });
    // Pass tuple as argument.
    M(tuple);
    }

    static void M(Tuple<string, string[], int, int[]> tuple)
    {
    // Evaluate the tuple's items.
    Console.WriteLine(tuple.Item1);
    foreach (string value in tuple.Item2)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(value);
    }
    Console.WriteLine(tuple.Item3);
    foreach (int value in tuple.Item4)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(value);
    }
    }
}

Output

perl
java
c#
1
2
3

NOTE: Use of Tuple is valid from Framework 4.0 and above.Tuple type is a class. It will be allocated in a separate location on the managed heap in memory. Once you create the Tuple, you cannot change the values of its fields. This makes the Tuple more like a struct.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for complete example of how to use out paramter. – Louise Eggleton Jan 7 '15 at 22:35

It's been a long while, but this feature is about to make it to upcoming C# 7 release. It is based on Tuples, but now the language will have much better syntax and support for them.

https://github.com/dotnet/roslyn/issues/347

You can currently play with the preview build of VS, but it won't be official until it releases. The syntax is still in flux, but currently it is a very natural:

public (int sum, int count) ReturnMultipleValues(int someParam) { ... }

More info: http://www.infoq.com/news/2015/10/csharp-7-sneak-peek?

I'll update this answer, removing the issues links and explaining the full syntax once the syntax is finalized :)

share|improve this answer

Just use in OOP manner a class like this:

class div
{
    public int remainder;

    public int quotient(int dividend, int divisor)
    {
        remainder = ...;
        return ...;
    }
}

The function member returns the quotient which most callers are primarily interested in. Additionally it stores the remainder as a data member, which is easily accessible by the caller afterwards.

This way you can have many additional "return values", very useful if you implement database or networking calls, where lots of error messages may be needed but only in case an error occurs.

I entered this solution also in the C++ question that OP is referring to.

share|improve this answer

A method taking a delegate can provide multiple values to the caller. This borrows from my answer here and uses a little bit from Hadas's accepted answer.

delegate void ValuesDelegate(int upVotes, int comments);
void GetMultipleValues(ValuesDelegate callback)
{
    callback(1, 2);
}

Callers provide a lambda (or a named function) and intellisense helps by copying the variable names from the delegate.

GetMultipleValues((upVotes, comments) =>
{
     Console.WriteLine($"This post has {upVotes} Up Votes and {comments} Comments.");
});
share|improve this answer

From this article, you can use three options as posts above said.

KeyValuePair is quickest way.

out is at the second.

Tuple is the slowest.

Anyway, this is depend on what is the best for your scenario.

share|improve this answer

you can try this

public IEnumerable<string> Get()
 {
     return new string[] { "value1", "value2" };
 }
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't really return multiple values. It returns a single, collection value. – Matthew Haugen Sep 5 '14 at 4:16

Ways to do it:

1) KeyValuePair (Best Performance - 0.32 ns):

    KeyValuePair<int, int> Location(int p_1, int p_2, int p_3, int p_4)
    {                 
         return new KeyValuePair<int,int>(p_2 - p_1, p_4-p_3);
    }

2) Tuple - 5.40 ns:

    Tuple<int, int> Location(int p_1, int p_2, int p_3, int p_4)
    {
          return new Tuple<int, int>(p_2 - p_1, p_4-p_3);
    }

3) out (1.64 ns) or ref 4) Create your own custom class/struct

ns -> nanoseconds

Reference: multiple-return-values.

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