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I am writing a site, and some pages are requested both with Ajax, or with a normal request. Of course, when requesting with Ajax, I'd like to render a slightly different template. I've tried several methods (A render_block snippet which was a great idea but buggy, using {% include %} to separate the templates while factorizing the code, using {% ifnot request.is_ajax %} to render content, like toolbar or menu, only if not Ajax). So I thought that it would be really cool to do like so :

<div> A menu that should not appear with Ajax </div>
{% ajax %}
<div> The Ajax part </div>
{% endajax %}
<div> A footer that should not appear with Ajax </div>

Then normal request returns :

<div> A menu that should not appear with Ajax </div>
<div> The Ajax part </div>
<div> A footer that should not appear with Ajax </div>

Ajax request :

<div> The Ajax part </div>

However, I don't really now where to start ... I've already written template tags, but never had to do something so complicated ! IS it even possible ?

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What exactly does not work if you do: {% if request.is_ajax %} <div> The Ajax part </div> {% endif %} –  schneck Sep 20 '11 at 7:59
    
No ! Because I want to trim what is outside of the tag !!! –  sebpiq Sep 20 '11 at 8:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

That sounds like a really confusing way of doing it - I'd definitely stick to:

{% if not request.is_ajax %}
<div> A menu that should not appear with Ajax </div>
{% endif %}
<div> The Ajax part </div>
{% if not request.is_ajax %}
<div> A footer that should not appear with Ajax </div>
{% endif %}

Alternatively, separate out your templates, so that the stuff you want rendered both times is in one template (we'll call this my_ajax_template.html):

<div> The Ajax part </div>

When responding to requests that come from AJAX your view code can just render that template, but when responding to "normal" requests, you could render a template that looked like this:

<div> A menu that should not appear with Ajax </div>
{% include 'my_ajax_template.html' %}
<div> A footer that should not appear with Ajax </div>
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Yep ... like I said I tried both ... one problem is that separating the templates forces me to use 'include', which makes the use of 'extends' more complicated, and even breaks most of my templates (and THAT annoys me :( ). Could you develop, why do you think it confusing ? I think it is very concise and non-obtrusive (no need to conditionally render different templates) –  sebpiq Sep 20 '11 at 8:09
    
I stuck to {% if not request.is_ajax %} <div> A menu that should not appear with Ajax </div> {% endif %} it is probably the simplest thing to do ... –  sebpiq Sep 28 '11 at 12:42

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