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When using asset pipeline in rails 3.1, it creates a default application.js:

//= require jquery
//= require jquery_ujs
//= require_tree .

but when will I need include all of my javascript? In most cases we use different javascrips for different controllers/views?

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I almost never try to split up my JavaScript so granularly; it's not worth the effort of making sure each and every page has the precise files necessary. Minified, gzipped JavaScript size is pretty small. –  Dave Newton Sep 20 '11 at 8:47
3  
But how about css? CSS has no namespace(unlike javascript), doesn't require_tree . easily make produce conflicts? –  Lai Yu-Hsuan Sep 20 '11 at 9:29
1  
I've almost never had substantial CSS conflicts, but I suppose it could be an issue, sure--but at that point, you're beyond needing default behavior, so removing the default configuration seems reasonable. Remember--Rails is opinionated, and not everyone has the same opinion :) –  Dave Newton Sep 20 '11 at 10:05
    
you're advise is resonable. Thanks –  Lai Yu-Hsuan Sep 20 '11 at 10:47
    
You're welcome :) –  Dave Newton Sep 20 '11 at 10:48
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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

require_tree . will result in you having a single file (application.js in this case) holding all your scripts that is there in the folder. And the fact that browsers will only pull that file once from your web server (unless you do a Ctrl + R refresh or there is a change in file cache property), does make the apps behave faster for subsequent requests.

Unless of course you have an application that have quite varying and huge scripts and a typical user is not expected to move around much that he wouldn't need majority of those. Which obviously is not very common case.

for additional and detailed information. look here http://guides.rubyonrails.org/asset_pipeline.html

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Browser loads application.js once and then gets it from cache.

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