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My question is what is JIT (just in time compiler?). Can anybody give me an explanation?

I think JIT is used in Java but do not know more about it.

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closed as not constructive by Bart Kiers, AVD, Péter Török, Soner Gönül, stema Sep 20 '11 at 8:43

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For all your general questions about it, see: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-in-time_compilation (or Google). If you have a specific, programming related question w.r.t. JIT compilation, feel free to ask here. –  Bart Kiers Sep 20 '11 at 8:38

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

just a very fast compiler… In this incarnation, pretty much a one-pass compiler — no offline computations. So you can’t look at the whole method, rank the expressions according to which ones are re-used the most, and then generate code. In theory terms, it’s an on-line problem.

the Java programming language and environment, a just-in-time (JIT) compiler is a program that turns Java bytecode (a program that contains instructions that must be interpreted) into instructions that can be sent directly to the processor. After you've written a Java program, the source language statements are compiled by the Java compiler into bytecode rather than into code that contains instructions that match a particular hardware platform's processor (for example, an Intel Pentium microprocessor or an IBM System/390 processor). The bytecode is platform-independent code that can be sent to any platform and run on that platform.

JIT typically causes a slight delay in initial execution of an application, due to the time taken to load and compile the bytecode. Sometimes this delay is called "startup time delay". In general, the more optimization JIT performs, the better the code it will generate, but the initial delay will also increase. A JIT compiler therefore has to make a trade-off between the compilation time and the quality of the code it hopes to generate. However, it seems that much of the startup time is sometimes due to IO-boundoperations rather than JIT compilation (for example, the rt.jar class data file for the Java Virtual Machine is 40 MB and the JVM must seek a lot of data in this contextually huge file).[2]

In the past, most programs written in any language have had to be recompiled, and sometimes, rewritten for each computer platform. One of the biggest advantages of Java is that you only have to write and compile a program once. The Java on any platform will interpret the compiled bytecode into instructions understandable by the particular processor. However, the virtual machine handles one bytecode instruction at a time. Using the Java just-in-time compiler (really a second compiler) at the particular system platform compiles the bytecode into the particular system code (as though the program had been compiled initially on that platform). Once the code has been (re-)compiled by the JIT compiler, it will usually run more quickly in the computer. The just-in-time compiler comes with the virtual machine and is used optionally. It compiles the bytecode into platform-specific executable code that is immediately executed. Sun Microsystems suggests that it's usually faster to select the JIT compiler option, especially if the method executable is repeatedly reused.

JIT typically causes a slight delay in initial execution of an application, due to the time taken to load and compile the bytecode. Sometimes this delay is called "startup time delay". In general, the more optimization JIT performs, the better the code it will generate, but the initial delay will also increase. A JIT compiler therefore has to make a trade-off between the compilation time and the quality of the code it hopes to generate. However, it seems that much of the startup time is sometimes due to IO-bound operations rather than JIT compilation (for example, the rt.jar class data file for the Java Virtual Machine is 40 MB and the JVM must seek a lot of data in this contextually huge file).[2]

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It's the part of the Java runtime that compiles byte code to native code at runtime. The JIT complier improves the performance of your code. This is because it is more expensive to interpret bytecode than it is to execute native machine code. The native code is generated once and reused.

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