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For my app, in xcode 4 I set a png for my launch image (in target)...but it appear only when I start app first time; is it possible to appear this launch image every time? Also when I put my app in background and I don't kill it. Is it possible?

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I wonder: why do you want that ? –  DarkDust Sep 20 '11 at 8:50
    
Because there is a reason... –  nazz_areno Sep 20 '11 at 8:52
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Um, alright, I already thought there's a reason. Care to explain which ? :-) –  DarkDust Sep 20 '11 at 8:59
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What does it matter? In any case, Tim's answer below explains why it is a bad idea. –  BryanH Sep 21 '11 at 2:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Even if quite some apps have them, there should not be a splash screen at all. Apple is clear about this in their Human Interface Guidelines:

To enhance the user’s experience at application launch, you must provide at least one launch image. A launch image looks very similar to the first screen your application displays. iOS displays this image instantly when the user starts your application and until the app is fully ready to use. As soon as your app is ready for use, your app displays its first screen, replacing the launch placeholder image.

Supply a launch image to improve user experience.

Avoid using it as an opportunity to provide:

An “application entry experience,” such as a splash screen An About window Branding elements, unless they are a static part of your application’s first screen Because users are likely to switch among applications frequently, you should make every effort to cut launch time to a minimum, and you should design a launch image that downplays the experience rather than drawing attention to it.

Generally, design a launch image that is identical to the first screen of the application.

To answer your question: You can implement the UIApplication delegate to take actions when your app did become active or will enter foreground:

- (void)applicationDidBecomeActive:(UIApplication *)application {

}


- (void)applicationWillEnterForeground:(UIApplication *)application {

}
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"Generally, design a launch image that is identical to the first screen of the application." This is bad advice, and yes it comes from Apple. It's bad because it leads the user to believe that your application is running but unresponsive. When the user taps controls on this dummy screen and gets no response, he may kill the app and try to restart it. Apple has advanced touch UIs, but not all of their ideas are good. Far from it. –  Oscar Sep 22 '11 at 4:19
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@OscarGoldman: I don't agree. You just have to design your splash screen to look like the deactivated or loading version of your app. Buttons should be deactivated or should not be displayed. Take a look at the maps or the phone app, they are nearly empty but don't show a splash screen that draws attention. Besides, the startup should take less than a second so I don't see a problem there. –  Tim Büthe Sep 22 '11 at 13:01

It is possible, but only if you actually implement it as a UIView that is called to render from your app delegate when your app re-enters the foreground.

But I would strongly advise against this practice, because you will greatly annoy your users because every time they switch back into your app they will be greeted by a splash screen that requires them to wait a second before they can carry on with their task.

The launch image is used only on a cold start of an application to reassure the user that the application is loading; it is not to be used as a gimmick.

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+1. Quite probably such app will not make it through review. –  zoul Sep 20 '11 at 8:58
    
I know, you're right, but there is an important reason to make it. Then thanks for the suggest –  nazz_areno Sep 20 '11 at 9:04

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