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I have a class for example Tile, with derive classes TileA, TileB... TileF.

Now I want always that class TileF changes with a call into TileE. And also TileE to TileD, and you can see the patern. Can I specify it directly in TileF where it changes into.

I'm looking at Activator.CreateInstance(), but this gives me a object class, and not the wanted derive class.

How can I solve this?

I do this in my Main loop, where I specified that Tile tile = TileF; then i want to do something like: tile.change() and that it changes in a new TileE

Some kind of code:

Class Tile{
   public abstract int Number{ get; }
}
Class TileF : Tile{
public override int Number
        {
            get
            {
                return 1;
            }
        }
} 
Class TileE : Tile{
public override int Number
        {
            get
            {
                return 2;
            }
        }
} 

Class Main{
Tile tile = new TileF;
//change tile to TileE
tile = tile.ToNextTileType();

}
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2  
plz explain what is "TileF changes with a call into TileE". what are u trying to achieve. perhaps sharing some code will put us in better condition to answer –  Muhammad Adeel Zahid Sep 20 '11 at 10:52
    
If the tiles all have the same behaviour, then inheritance is not the right tool for this job. Are there differences in behaviour between, for example, the TileA class and the TileB class? –  Matt Ellen Sep 20 '11 at 10:56
    
Sorry but it is not clear from your question what you want to do. Are you familiar with 'is' and 'as' because that might help you along the way. –  Hugh Jones Sep 20 '11 at 10:56
    
I can see TileF changing to TileE but not TileE to TileB - what logic is there at work here. Surely TileE should change to TileD? –  El Ronnoco Sep 20 '11 at 11:00
1  
Best I can make of it is that you should not (try to) change tiles at all. Tiles don't change but a player moves to another tile instance. Make sure you understand references. –  Henk Holterman Sep 20 '11 at 11:20

4 Answers 4

When TileE and TileF are siblings, ie when they derive from a common baseclass, you cannot convert them directly.

There are several possible solutions but you don't provide much detail.

I think that maybe you should not use inheritance. Could a simple enum TileType solve your problem(s)?

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Let's say that an other class like main holds a Tile tile = new TileF(), could I change that To TileE with a property of something of that in TileF? –  P-Storm Sep 20 '11 at 10:52
    
@P-Storm: no the types are 'unrelated'. –  jv42 Sep 20 '11 at 10:55
    
@P-Storm - why? What are you trying to do that for? –  Enigmativity Sep 20 '11 at 10:56
    
@Enigmativity I have made a list of tile, and sometimes it happens that when a player leaves a tile, that the image and other property changes. TileF holds an other imageindex than TileE –  P-Storm Sep 20 '11 at 10:57
    
@P-Storm - is it the case that the difference between each of the tile types is just that the properties of Tile just change values? Or are there other properties/methods that extend Tile? –  Enigmativity Sep 20 '11 at 11:02

You might want to look at interfaces. Interface lets unrelated objects be treated as the same thing when you reference a type of the Interface type e.g.

class ClassOne : ICommon;
class ClassTwo : ICommon;
class ClassThree : ICommon;

ClassOne x = new ClassOne();
ClassTwo y = new ClassTwo();
ClassThree z = new ClassThree();

List<ICommon> data = new List<ICommon>();
data.Add(x);
data.Add(y);
data.Add(z);

foreach(ICommon item in data)
{
    item.InterfaceMethodOne();
}

This might not be what you want but it is worth looking into.

James :-)

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The "problem" with this code is, that I have to change the type, or better, the propertys, that are static with each class. –  P-Storm Sep 20 '11 at 11:05
1  
How do you mean change the properties? If you have a base-class or interface that is common to all the objects you can interrogate the object to determine it's true class. –  James Culshaw Sep 20 '11 at 11:08
    
I don't want to have a large list like "if class is this than change to other class." Take as example that z is changing into a ClassTwo, without the "if class is thing" –  P-Storm Sep 20 '11 at 11:13

There is a difference between the static and the dynamic type of an object. The static type of an object can be changed, that is you may write BaseType base = (BaseType)new DerivedType();. Changing the static type of an instance is called casting.

The compiler will restrict the call to methods, fields and properties present in the BaseType and all of its base types. The dynamic type of an object however may never change and in this case base still has the dynamic type DerivedType. The condition if (base is DerivedType) will return true in this case. You can only "change" the dynamic type by instantiating a new object of the target type and copy the desired values to the new instance. This process is called mapping.

Btw, Activator.CreateInstance will only give you an instance of the static type object, but likely with a different dynamic type. You can change the static type by casting it to a type that you know the object should have: (DerivedType)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(DerivedType)). You can also use the generic variant, then this cast is done within the method: Activator.CreateInstance<DerivedType>(). Semantically there is no difference, except that the generic variant is easier to read.

EDIT:

Does this solve your problem?

public abstract class Tile {
  public abstract int Number { get; }
  public abstract Tile Advance();
}

public class TileA : Tile {
  public override int Number { get { return 1; } }
  public override Tile Advance() { return new TileB(); }
}

public class TileB : Tile {
  public override int Number { get { return 2; } }
  public override Tile Advance() { return new TileC(); }
}

public class TileC : Tile { ... }

You can also define the "state machine" in the abstract class like so:

public abstract class Tile {
  public abstract int Number { get; }
  public sealed Tile Advance() {
    if (this is TileA) {
      return new TileB();
    else if (this is TileB) {
      return new TileC();
    }
  }
}

Another alternative is of course to model the state machine entirely in one object:

public enum TileState { TileA, TileB, TileC };
public class Tile {
  private TileState state = TileState.TileA; // initial state

  public int Number {
    get {
      switch (state) {
        case TileState.TileA: return 1;
        case TileState.TileB: return 2;
        ...
        default: return -1; // or throw exception
      }
    }
  }

  public void Advance() {
    switch (state) {
      case TileState.TileA: state = TileState.TileB; break;
      case TileState.TileB: state = TileState.TileC; break;
      ...
      default: // exception ?
    }
  }
}

In the last example, the behavior of your object changes depending on the state variable. It's not a new instance, but it can do something completely different. I hope something of this could help.

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The problem here is that I cannot find a way to strong type the type. I can make a abstract property Type in the Tile class, but can't cast it to that property, like you said, it will be a type object. So for the clarrification Type t = typeof(TileE); Tile tile = new TileF(); tile = (??t??)ctivator.CreateInstance(t) //tile is a TileE –  P-Storm Sep 20 '11 at 11:18
    
I don't understand your code. If you know that t is a Type that represents TileE then you could do Tile tile = Activator.CreateInstance<TileE>(); straight away. I edited my answer to hopefully give you some alternatives on how to solve your problem. –  Andreas Sep 20 '11 at 12:18
    
Did find that I could join the tiles thus avoiding the problem :) –  P-Storm Sep 21 '11 at 14:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I made an error in designing TileF/TileE etc. It was good enough to make a TileN, with a property that is replacing the inner working of a tile. This way I don't have to substitute a class, and thus avoiding this problem.

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