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Recently I read that the sign $ is allowed in Java variable names, but has a special meaning. Unfortunately it isn't mentioned what this special meaning is.

Therefore I ask here: What is the special meaning of $ in variable names in Java?

Here is the exact quote from

Java: An Introduction to Problem Solving and Programming

from Walter Savitch:

Java does allow the dollar sign symbol $ to appear in an identifier, but these identifiers have a special meaning, so you should not use the $ symbol in your identifiers.

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Related thread : stackoverflow.com/questions/6167326/… –  AVD Sep 20 '11 at 11:19
    
Citing where you read this might be nice. –  Don Roby Sep 20 '11 at 11:22
    
I edited the question. –  anon Sep 20 '11 at 11:24
    
AFAIK there's no special meaning, so you can use it in your variable declarations. But it violates Java Naming Conventions. Maybe he's talking about class names? –  Mister Smith Sep 20 '11 at 11:29
    
@MisterSmith I suspect the "special meaning" referred by the author is just the convention of only using it on machine-generated code. The "special meaning" is special by convention, not by semantics. –  brandizzi Sep 20 '11 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

$ is used internally by the compiler to decorate certain names. Wikipedia gives the following example:

public class foo {
    class bar {
        public int x;
    }

    public void zark () {
        Object f = new Object () {
            public String toString() {
                return "hello";
            }
        };
    }
}

Compiling this program will produce three .class files:

  • foo.class, containing the main (outer) class foo
  • foo$bar.class, containing the named inner class foo.bar
  • foo$1.class, containing the anonymous inner class (local to method foo.zark)

All of these class names are valid (as $ symbols are permitted in the JVM specification).

[end of quote]

In a similar vein, javac uses $ in some automatically-generated variable names: for example, this$0 et al are used for the implicit this references from the inner classes to their outer classes.

Finally, the JLS recommends the following:

The $ character should be used only in mechanically generated source code or, rarely, to access preexisting names on legacy systems.

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That's not really true. I can name my class Test$ –  RoflcoptrException Sep 20 '11 at 11:18
    
The question is not asking for class names, but for variables. –  Mister Smith Sep 20 '11 at 11:24
    
@brandizzi: It has been, even before your comment got posted. You must have been looking at an older version. –  NPE Sep 20 '11 at 11:24
    
@aix sorry, I bet you corrected it while I commented :) –  brandizzi Sep 20 '11 at 11:26

There is no special meaning for it:

"Variable names are case-sensitive. A variable's name can be any legal identifier — an unlimited-length sequence of Unicode letters and digits, beginning with a letter, the dollar sign "$", or the underscore character "". The convention, however, is to always begin your variable names with a letter, not "$" or "". Additionally, the dollar sign character, by convention, is never used at all. You may find some situations where auto-generated names will contain the dollar sign, but your variable names should always avoid using it. A similar convention exists for the underscore character; while it's technically legal to begin your variable's name with "_", this practice is discouraged. White space is not permitted."

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Thanks @brandizzi. –  pablosaraiva Sep 20 '11 at 11:41

The Oracle documentation says :

Variable names are case-sensitive. A variable's name can be any legal identifier — an unlimited-length sequence of Unicode letters and digits, beginning with a letter, the dollar sign "$", or the underscore character "". The convention, however, is to always begin your variable names with a letter, not "$" or "". Additionally, the dollar sign character, by convention, is never used at all. You may find some situations where auto-generated names will contain the dollar sign, but your variable names should always avoid using it. A similar convention exists for the underscore character; while it's technically legal to begin your variable's name with "_", this practice is discouraged. White space is not permitted.

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