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switch(ch){
          case 'a':
                 //do something, condition does not match so go to default case
                 //don't break in here, and don't allow fall through to other cases.
          case 'b':
                 //..
          case 'c':
                 //..
          case '_':
                 //...
          default:
                 //
                 break;
}

In a switch statement like above one I enter case 'a', I break only if the condition inside it occurs, otherwise I want to jump to default case. Is there any other way of doing this rather than labels or gotos?

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7 Answers 7

goto For The Win

switch (ch) {
    case 'a':
        if (1) goto LINE96532;
        break;
    case 'b':
        if (1) goto LINE96532;
        break;
LINE96532:
    default:
        //
        break;
}
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2  
But what about the rule that says you will be struck by lightning if you write spaghetti code :p ? –  James Poulson Jun 25 '12 at 9:03
    
Does this actually work for you? I pasted your code into chrome developer console and it threw an error "Unexpected identifier", complaining about the LINE96532: before the default:. –  Kirk Woll Jun 19 at 16:55
    
@KirkWoll: It works. I have put a running example at ideone.com. Does "chrome developer console" accept C code? –  pmg Jun 20 at 8:21
1  
@pmg, lol, terrible terribly sorry. I googled "javascript switch goto" and this was the second hit. In my inattentiveness, I hadn't realized this question has nothing to do with Javascript. –  Kirk Woll Jun 20 at 13:58

Just reorder the cases so that that case is the last:

switch(ch){
          case 'b':
                 //..
          case 'c':
                 //..
          case '_':
                 //...
          case 'a':
                 //do something, condition does not match so go to default case
                 if (condition)
                     break;
                 //don't break in here, and don't allow fall through to other cases.
          default:
                 //
                 break;
}
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but this time case 'b' will be problem. –  thetux4 Sep 20 '11 at 11:57
2  
Ah, all the cases have to behave equally? Then, you have to explain your question a little bit more, because, for example, the condition depends on the value of the case? –  Diego Sevilla Sep 20 '11 at 11:58
    
Yeah, but the condition inside it don't have to depend on cases. –  thetux4 Sep 20 '11 at 12:00

If the condition doesn't depend on cases, why put it inside?

if (!condition){
  // do default
}else{
  switch(ch){
    case 'a':
      // do a
      break;
    ...
  }
}
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I got that question wrong i guess. I mean I should check the condition when the case occurs. Otherwise you'r right. –  thetux4 Sep 20 '11 at 12:20
    
Do you mean that you want to check the condition only if ch belongs to ( 'a', 'b', 'c', '-')? –  mouviciel Sep 20 '11 at 12:29
    
Yeah I meant that. –  thetux4 Sep 20 '11 at 12:37

Refactor your code:

int test_char(char ch)
{
  switch(ch) {
    case 'a': if (condition) return 0; break;
    case 'b': // ...
    default: return -1;
  }

  return 1;
}

... 
// defaults processing switch
switch(test_char(ch)) {
  case 0: break; // condition met
  case 1: // default processing
  default: // case not handled by test_char
}

This also adds the benefit of being flexible to test for multiple classes of default processing. Say you have a group of chars [c, d, e, f] which share some common logic. Simply return 2 from test_char() for these cases (possibly after some conditions has been tested), and add a case 2: handler to the default processing switch statement.

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Clever thinking :) –  James Poulson Jun 25 '12 at 9:03
    
Hmm... I'd forgot about this question. Wonder why I got no response from @thetux4 on it... (I kind of like it too, surely it wasn't too advanced? ;) –  Kaos Jun 26 '12 at 8:23

I'm not sure if thes is the best answer, but here it goes:

If you absolutely do not want to use labels, and you want to keep the cases in their current order, then you could continue after case 'a' and then check so see if(ch != 'a') at the beginning of each subsequent case, only executing the statement if the condition is true:

switch(ch){
    case 'a':
        // do something
    case 'b':
    if(ch != 'a') {
        //do something
    }
    //repeat for each subsequent case
    default:
        //do something
    break;
}

This is probably not the most efficient way to solve your problem, but it should accomplish what you want.

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1  
Yeah but instead of doing that using goto looks better i guess? –  thetux4 Sep 20 '11 at 12:11
1  
I agree. goto really sounds like your best option. –  Andrew Sep 20 '11 at 12:14

If you must have the switch statements first because the condition you're checking for depends on the case (or the case has to be evaluated first before you can check on the condition), simply set a flag inside your switch cases, and if that flag is set, then do a default operation. For instance:

int default_true = 0;
switch (case_value)
{
    case 'a': /* if the condition is true, set the default_true flag */

    case 'b': /* if the condition is true, set the default_true flag */

    //...

    default: default_flag = 1; // set the default_true flag to true
}

if (default_flag)
{
    //place your "default" code here rather than inside the switch statement
    //this prevents code reduplication
}
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the conditions inside the cases are not same. –  thetux4 Sep 20 '11 at 12:38
    
Yes, but you can test for the condition that you're wanting a "default" case for, and set the flag to trigger a run of the "default" code inside the if-statement ... or are you saying that you need a different "default" handler for each case? ... I've cleaned up the code a little to explain what I was meaning a bit better. –  Jason Sep 20 '11 at 12:41

Here's what I did:

char ucResult = 1;
switch(ch){
      case 'a':
          if(ucResult){
             // do something
             if(error) ucResult = 0;
          }
      case 'b':
          if(ucResult){
             // do something
             if(error) ucResult = 0;
          }
      case 'c':
          if(ucResult){
             // do something
             if(error) ucResult = 0;
          }
      case '_':
          if(ucResult){
             // do something
             if(error) ucResult = 0;
          }
      default:
             //
             break;
}

With this structure, you can switch to default case from any previous cases. Handy for breaking outer loops too.

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