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What's the right way to send user input to a class?

Foo class:

<?php
class Foo
{
    private $_bar;

    private setBar($bar)
    {
        $this->_bar = $bar;
    }
}
?>

Using foo class...

<?php
$foo = new Foo();
$foo->setBar((int) $_POST['input']);
?>

Or should I do the following?

Foo class:

<?php
class Foo
{
    private $_bar;

    private setBar($bar)
    {
        $this->_bar = (int) $bar;
    }
}
?>

Using foo class...

<?php
$foo = new Foo();
$foo->setBar($_POST['input']);
?>

Should I convert data inside of the get method or pass data to classes already converted? What's the best approach? Why?

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closed as too localized by Gordon, Lightness Races in Orbit, ircmaxell, OZ_, salathe Sep 20 '11 at 14:13

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
whatever works for you –  Gordon Sep 20 '11 at 13:58
1  
+1 for "whatever works for you", I've never heard of a "right" way to do this. Whichever you pick though, be consistent. It'll help a lot when you're 10000 lines of code into a site! –  Clive Sep 20 '11 at 14:00
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Better yet would be to validate by an exception. If you add another method like:

public function calculateSalary() {
  // uses bar, wants int
  return 100 * $this->_bar;
}

and someone uses the class like this:

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->setBar('My Name Here');
echo $foo->calculateSalary(); // will give a result since php is forgiving

To avoid mishaps like these, I write setters similar to this:

public function setFoo($number) {
  if(!is_numeric($number)) {
    throw new Exception(__METHOD__." wants a number!");
  }
  $this->_foo = $number;
}

Arguments against #1: user might not include (int) and therefor data with the wrong type is set in the object.

Arguments against #2: (see example above). PHP is translating a string to 0 if used while calculating. That means you probably will get an error without even knowing about it until you check the results.

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+1, otherwise you'll have to repeat the cast everytime you call this method. That is of course if _bar should always be an int. –  Dunhamzzz Sep 20 '11 at 14:02
    
@Dunhamzzz I actually changed my mind, wrote too quickly. I hope you like this direction as well, otherwise feel free to retract your +1 (he voted on answer before edit). –  chelmertz Sep 20 '11 at 14:06
    
PHP is translating a non-empty string to 1 if used while calculating - not unless you convert to boolean and then to int. For an int conversion, it takes the longest prefix which looks like a number; if there is no such thing, the result is 0. Anyway, you should not clutter up your classes with validation - separating responsibilities is the basic of OOP. There should be a separate class responsible for validating and transforming untrusted user input, and validating trusted internal data is not worth the effort IMO. –  Tgr Sep 20 '11 at 15:39
    
@Tgr: you are correct about casting string to int, I edited accordingly. I agree with you about separating concerns but I can picture this class to be the one "responsible for validating and transforming untrusted user input", in preparation for another class to consume - or did I miss anything else that's obvious? :) Cheers –  chelmertz Sep 20 '11 at 16:03
    
@chelmertz: You shouldn't wire your variable names into the validation class, that's very inflexible. I would rather use something like $businessClass->setBar(Post::getInt('input')) (or even $Post->getInt(...) if you expect it will be heavily unit-tested); the validator class can deal with checking whether the variable exists, cleaning input, throwing errors, and it is a reusable component, fully independent from your business logic. –  Tgr Sep 20 '11 at 16:23
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It's better to make the validation at the inner level possible, so there is no way to end up storing invalid values inside the class (or the database or ...). Of course, that doesn't mean that you couldn't also perform validation at an outer level to save some cycles. So I would choose the second example.

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Define your class's API and work backwards from there.

In this case, forcing the class to store ints probably makes the most sense, and you can guarantee that only in the second example.

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bar is an int. So setBar should get an int (first option). If you want to force it into an int, I would expect a function called setBarFromString (or something like that).

setBar might trhow an exception on receiving a non-int.

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