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Is it safe to say that the Java virtual machine was 'originally' designed for the Java programming language, but now, other developers have been able to write programming languages that compile to Java bytecode like Scala, Jython and JRuby.

There are still 'object oriented' references in the Java bytecode like interfaces, methods, fields. For example invokespecial is a call on a 'object' method.

It is not a pure stack virtual machine with pure a language agnostic instruction set. For example, a pure FORTH implementation would only have stack operations.

The question, is the JVM language agnostic or not?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by finnw, Peter Olson, dmckee, devnull, Ganesh Sittampalam Dec 23 '13 at 6:47

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In the sense that the JVM and java bytecode is turing-complete, any other turing-complete language can be transformed and compiled to java bytecode and run on the JVM. It may be horribly inefficient, but not impossible. As for the strictest possible definition of "agnostic", there is no such thing. At a hardware-level, all processors have a defined set of binary instructions they support so at some point, any language will have to be transformed to an assembly compatible with the hardware it's supposed to execute on.

EDIT: The JVM was not developed in a vacuum, it was developed in conjunction with the JAVA programming language so it stands to reason that the Java language heavily influenced the design of the Java byte-code and the JVM. So in that sense, you could say that the JVM was designed with Java in mind. But it is also true that in the architecture, the JVM was consciously de-coupled from the Java language (through the intermediate bytecode format) so there are elements in the design that takes possible alternative languages into account.

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I meant, is the JVM designed specifically for Java or not in that sense. –  Berlin Brown Sep 20 '11 at 15:56
    
+1 Yes, they are all Turing complete, and at one level of efficiency or another, can be used to simulate the other. –  Edwin Buck Sep 20 '11 at 15:57
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@BerlinBrown The JVM was not developed in a vacuum, it was developed in conjunction with the JAVA programming language so it stands to reason that the Java language heavily influenced the design of the Java byte-code and the JVM. So in that sense, you could say that the JVM was designed with Java in mind. But it is also true that in the architecture, the JVM was consciously de-coupled from the Java language (through the intermediate bytecode format) so there are elements in the design that takes possible alternative languages into account. –  pap Sep 22 '11 at 7:09
    
Cool pap, that is a good response. You might want to add that to your answer. –  Berlin Brown Sep 22 '11 at 19:28

The JVM is definitely not language-agnostic, and some languages can't be implemented efficiently on it. The JVM offers no memory addressing operations, for instance, so an implementation of a lower-level language like C would be horribly inefficient. But its set of primitives is capable of supporting many popular languages with features different from Java's, given a suitably smart compiler. The languages that can be implemented decently aren't necessarily just Java with syntactic sugar; but of course the more different you get from Java, the harder it is to implement the language

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... as long as those "popular languages" are semantically equivalent to Java... –  SK-logic Sep 20 '11 at 14:46
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@SK: In Clintonian fashion, I have to say that depends on your definition of "semantically equivalent." Java has only static typing; Ruby has "duck typing." Yet JRuby exists. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Sep 20 '11 at 14:50
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Java is still an imperative, object oriented language. JRuby has a similar program flow. Call a method with arguments on an object and repeat. There may difficultly in implementing something like Haskell or Erlang on top of the Java virtual machine without hacks. –  Berlin Brown Sep 20 '11 at 14:52
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@Ernest, it is a minor difference, and still JRuby compiler is really complicated. JVM won't allow you to compile efficiently (and Ruby was never designed for efficiency anyway) any language which is significantly different from Java. Two major issues are: a lack of explicit tail calls and a ridiculous method size limit. –  SK-logic Sep 20 '11 at 14:58
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If you want, you can write an interpreter for the other language in Java. It's how they managed to get many languages in the JVM, especially when the language makes assumptions about the machine that doesn't hold for the JVM. Since all Turing-complete languages have (provably) equal (expressive) power, some Rube Goldberg solution should exist for every Turing-complete language to simulate another Turing-complete lanugage's operations. –  Edwin Buck Sep 20 '11 at 15:01

The JVM is not language-agnostic; however, it's language is JVM bytecode. Consider that the assembly of the virtual machine and then you'll have a good idea of what the JVM runs. JVM bytecode was selected to facilitate running Java programs, but like any "complete enough" assembly, it can be used for many other things. The key is what's being done in the compilation process.

Other language barriers include the design that the JVM is a stack based machine, which means explicit addresses are nonsense to the JVM in the bytecode layer. There's no "load" or "store" operations; however, that doesn't stop people who want to implement languages that do addressing on the JVM. It just makes it harder for those who want to do addressing.

To do addressing on the JVM, you basically write a simulator; where you have an object containing the "address to object handle" lookup table. This allows you to do rudimentary addressing via simulation on a virtual machine that lacks addressing. It's not always pretty, and the quality of the simulation is only typically extended to the use cases that the simulated language would permit.

Yes, you do lose a bit of performance doing Address(the object) to Map(of object to Java heap reference) to (internally in the JVM) java heap reference to physical memory address. But that's what has to be done to keep the platform agnostic. If you had direct memory access, you would eventually be pushed into coding for different hardware platforms instead of coding for the virtual machine. Well, at least you would be pushed into platform specific code much earlier than occurs these days.

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Depending upon what one is doing with "addresses", one could, I would think, just use a few int[] to hold everything of interest. In some cases, even when writing Java, using an int[] to a collection structured data may be more efficient than using an array of objects. For example, a program which will need many immutable lists of integers, many of which could be short, could store all the lists within a single int[], each preceded by length, and pass around indices into the array rather than references to array objects. –  supercat Dec 8 '13 at 18:56
    
Exactly what kind of portable across platform int are you talking about? Exactly what kind of int can hold addresses? Sure it works on some platforms, sometimes, under certain operating systems; but, outside of one or two popular combinations, it fails for everything else. –  Edwin Buck Dec 9 '13 at 15:11
    
If one were trying to write an emulator for a classic 512K Macintosh in Java, one could use an short[] mem = new short[262144] to hold the contents of its memory; one would store value16 to addr by if (addr & 1) throw someException; else mem[addr>>1]=value16; A byte store would be if (addr & 1) mem[addr>>=1] = (mem[addr>>1] & 0x00FF) | (value8 << 8); else (mem[addr>>=1] = (mem[addr>>1] & 0xFF00) | (value8);. Not exactly elegant, but adequate for many purposes. If one can use word-based rather than byte-based addresses, the LSB handling may be avoided. –  supercat Dec 9 '13 at 16:22
    
And if one were to write a JVM on a 64 bit memory addressing model that supported 32 bit ints? And what about all the other systems? The idea that the best plan of action is to throw away C's type checking in favor of int packing of addresses is borderline rediculous. What's wrong with using a void* (or better yet a struct*), where they size might not be known, but you don't have to work against the type system? –  Edwin Buck Dec 9 '13 at 19:36
    
A C compiler for the JVM could produce code which would store a reference to one or more arrays in a static variable and then use those arrays to hold everything whose address is ever taken. The compiler would translate code which uses things like structs into JVM code that generates suitable array accesses for things whose address isn't taken (a struct whose address is never taken could simply be regarded as a bunch of independent variables). Since the JVM has no concept of non-primitive value types, any sort of array-of-struct behavior will have to be emulated anyway. –  supercat Dec 9 '13 at 19:53

Ignoring the builtin OOP instructions some languages are better suited for a register based VM (like parrot) instead of a stack based VM (like JVM).

This paper covers the issue nicely: http://db.usenix.org/events/vee05/full_papers/p153-yunhe.pdf

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