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A colleague of mine stumbled upon a method to floor float numbers using a bitwise or:

var a = 13.6 | 0; //a == 13

We were talking about it and wondering a few things.

  • How does it work? Our theory was that using such an operator casts the number to an integer, thus removing the fractional part
  • Does it have any advantages over doing Math.floor? Maybe it's a bit faster? (pun not intended)
  • Does it have any disadvantages? Maybe it doesn't work in some cases? Clarity is an obvious one, since we had to figure it out, and well, I'm writting this question.

Thanks.

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Disadvantage: it only works up to 2^31−1 which is around 2 billion (10^9). The max Number value is around 10^308 btw. –  Šime Vidas Sep 20 '11 at 15:51
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Example: 3000000000.1 | 0 evaluates to -1294967296. So this method can't be applied for money calculations (especially in cases where you multiply by 100 to avoid decimal numbers). –  Šime Vidas Sep 20 '11 at 16:08
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@ŠimeVidas Floats shouldn't be used in money calculations also –  George Reith Feb 20 at 10:02
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I personally like ~~ for bitwise flooring. var a = ~~13.6; // a == 13 –  John Strickler Nov 19 at 17:48
    
It is not flooring, it is truncating (rounding towards 0). –  Barth Zalewski Dec 9 at 14:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

How does it work? Our theory was that using such an operator casts the number to an integer, thus removing the fractional part

All bitwise operations except unsigned right shift, >>>, work on signed 32-bit integers. So using bitwise operations will convert a float to an integer.

Does it have any advantages over doing Math.floor? Maybe it's a bit faster? (pun not intended)

http://jsperf.com/or-vs-floor/2 seems slightly faster

Does it have any disadvantages? Maybe it doesn't work in some cases? Clarity is an obvious one, since we had to figure it out, and well, I'm writting this question.

  • Will not pass jsLint.
  • 32-bit signed integers only
  • Odd Comparative behavior: Math.floor(NaN) === NaN, while (NaN | 0) === 0
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wow that's a HUGE performance difference, doesn't it round the wrong way around for negative numbers though? –  harold Sep 22 '11 at 12:03
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@harold indeed, because it does not in fact round, merely truncates. –  Alex Turpin Apr 10 '12 at 18:46
    
interesting, you can identify a browser with this... –  kratenko Jun 8 '12 at 20:25
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Another possible disadvantage is that Math.floor(NaN) === NaN, while (NaN | 0) === 0. That difference might be important in some applications. –  Ted Hopp Jan 2 '13 at 1:56
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Your jsperf is yielding performance information for empty loops on chrome due to loop invariant code motion. A slightly better perf test would be: jsperf.com/floor-performance/2 –  Sam Giles May 8 '13 at 12:04

Your first point is correct. The number is cast to an integer and thus any decimal digits are removed. Please note, that Math.floor rounds to the next integer towards minus infinity and thus gives a different result when applied to negative numbers.

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This is truncation as opposed to flooring. Howard's answer is sort of correct; But I would add that Math.floor does exactly what it is supposed to with respect to negative numbers. Mathematically, that is what a floor is.

In the case you described above, the programmer was more interested in truncation or chopping the decimal completely off. Although, the syntax they used sort of obscures the fact that they are converting the float to an int.

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  • The specs say that it is converted to an integer:

    Let lnum be ToInt32(lval).

  • Performance: this has been tested at jsperf before.

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