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some customer is asking for get the searchbase from the domain used on my app.

for example, if the domain controller of my domain is, ad.mydomain.com is correct to build the serch base in the following way: dc=ad,dc=mydomain,dc=com?

Im not sure if once the domain change the searchbase must change also because otherwise my app. wont work fine.

Thx.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes usually that is the case (at least in case of Active Directory). We have dev.company.com for dev AD instance and company.com for prod AD instance and search-bases are dc=dev,dc=company,dc=com and dc=company,dc=com respectively.

I have seen same practice in Spring Security's AD authentication provider. It derives the root DN from domain name as follows:

private String rootDnFromDomain(String domain) {
    String[] tokens = StringUtils.tokenizeToStringArray(domain, ".");
    StringBuilder root = new StringBuilder();

    for (String token : tokens) {
        if (root.length() > 0) {
            root.append(',');
        }
        root.append("dc=").append(token);
    }

    return root.toString();
}

source: Spring Security ActiveDirectoryLdapAuthenticationProvider.java's source

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While there may be a convention of using dc=domain,dc=com in the AD world, the correct way to determine the naming contexts supported by the directory server is to query the root DSE for the namingContexts attribute. The naming contexts listed are the ones hosted or shadowed by the server. For more information about the root DSE, see "LDAP: The root DSE". Be aware that the server might host or shadow multiple naming contexts. Also, see "LDAP: Programming Practices".

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