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This is more of a style question. I have a template file header.php in which I define a PrintHeader() function.

Callers of this function can specify, via global variables, the title of the page and any Javascript scripts to include when printing the header (because surely not every page will have the same title or want to include the same scripts). I chose to use global variables rather than function arguments because the latter would require the interface to change when adding new arguments.

Is this considered "good" style, and is there a "better" way to do what I'm trying to do?

header.php (simplified)

<?php
function PrintHeader()
{
  global $pageTitle, $scripts; // Set by the caller of this function

  echo <<<HEADER
<html>
 <head>
  <title>$pageTitle</title>

HEADER;

  if( !empty($scripts) )
  {
    foreach($scripts as $script)
    {
      echo "  <script type=\"text/javascript\" src=\"$script.js\"></script>\n";
    }
  }

  echo " </head>\n";
}
?>

index.php (simplified)

<?php
  $pageTitle = 'Welcome';
  $scripts = array('script1', 'script2');
  require('header.php');
  PrintHeader();

  // Print the rest of the page
?>
share|improve this question
    
google global variables bad –  webbiedave Sep 20 '11 at 17:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

is there a "better" way to do what I'm trying to do?

sure.
I see no point in defining and calling a function at all. as well as in using heredoc.

header.php (dramatically simplified):

<html>
 <head>
  <title><?=$pageTitle?></title>

<? if( !empty($scripts) ): ?>
  <?  foreach($scripts as $script): ?>
<script type="text/javascript" src="<?=$script?>.js"></script>
  <? endforeach ?>
<? endif ?>
  </head>

index.php:

<?php
  $pageTitle = 'Welcome';
  $scripts = array('script1', 'script2');
  require('header.php');
?>

but still it's not the best way, as it seems you're not using a template where it most valuable - to output page contents itself.

So, I'd make it in three parts:

links.php (simplified):

<?
//include our settings, connect to database etc.
include dirname($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']).'/cfg/settings.php';
//getting required data
$DATA = getdata("SELECT * FROM links");
$pagetitle = "Links to friend sites";
//etc
//and then call a template:
$tpl = "links.tpl.php";
include "main.tpl.php";
?>

where main.tpl.php is your main site template, including common parts, like header, footer, menu etc:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>My site. <?=$pagetitle?></title>
</head>
<body>
<div id="page">
<? include $tpl ?>
</div>
</body>
</html>

and finally links.tpl.php is the actual page template:

<h2><?=$pagetitle?></h2>
<ul>
<? foreach($DATA as $row): ?>
<li><a href="<?=$row['link']?>" target="_blank"><?=$row['name']?></a></li>
<? endforeach ?>
<ul>

notice native HTML syntax, which is highlighted, readable and centralized in one place instead of being split between numerous functions and files

The point is in having separate template for the every PHP page as well as main site template for them all. With such setup you'll get a lot of advantages such as custom error pages, multiple representations of the same data (say, HTML, JSON or XML) by switching only templates without changing the code and many more

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. In actuality I'm using more template functions that just PrintHeader(), but I mentioned only PrintHeader() because the same question applies to the other template functions that use variables set by the caller. I probably could've been more clear about that. –  Anson Sep 20 '11 at 18:56
    
It's obvious that you're using more functions. However I see no point in using them at all. –  Your Common Sense Sep 20 '11 at 18:59
    
Ok I'm with you so far, but what if $DATA consisted of HTML content such as <div id="mainContent"><p>Paragraph 1</p><p>Paragraph 2</p></div>. Would you suggest putting that markup in another file, say page_content.php and doing $DATA = file_get_contents('page_content.php');? Would that entail that every mypage.php has a corresponding mypage_content.php? –  Anson Sep 21 '11 at 6:39
    
that's impossible for $DATA to consist of HTML. it's DATA, as it's name clearly says. And it's template that consists of HTML. Did you read my answer at all? That's what I am talking about: I HAVE put page markup into another file, links.tpl.php and call it from the main template. And yes - you ought to have separate template for the every PHP page. That's the point. Template for the every page is the key of using templates. –  Your Common Sense Sep 21 '11 at 7:03
1  
I should've clarified it better in the answer. With such setup you'll get a lot of advantages such as custom error pages, multiple representations of the same data (say, HTML, JSON or XML) by switchiong only templates without changing the code and many more –  Your Common Sense Sep 21 '11 at 7:31

The use of global variables is certainly not advisable, and I question the necessity of using heredoc as you have - not that there is anything inherently wrong with heredoc, just that you seem to have rather arbitrarily utilized it in this sample template.

It is not elegant to use a return-value of a function as the output of each template - this defeats one of the purposes of templates which is re-usability.

Take a look at smarty, if not to directly use it (after all, why re-invent the wheel), at least to get an idea of how a rendering class is used to shuttle in the variables that a template needs without resorting to messy globals.

share|improve this answer

Here's a very quick overview of a way to do templating:

You have a template class that you can assign data to and then render a template.

Template.php:

class Template
{
    protected $data = array();
    public function assign($key, $value)
    {
        $this->data[$key] = $value;
    }

    public function render($file)
    {
        extract($this->data);
        require $file;
    }
}

You then have your template, header.php:

<html>
 <head>
   <title><?php echo $pageTitle; ?></title>
....

In index.php, you then use the template class to assign data and render your template.

$tpl = new Template;
$tpl->assign('pageTitle', 'My page title!');
$tpl->render('header.php');

This is just a simple example to demonstrate the idea, and could give you a good starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. When invoking a second template, let's say links.php, I'd want to avoid passing it stale data. So I'd need to either 1. Give class Template a clearData() function; 2. create a new instance of Template for each template invoked; 3. Something else. Which method is preferable? –  Anson Sep 20 '11 at 22:58
    
@Anson one way would be to modify it to allow assigning data to a specific template. There's lots of ways to expand on this--it's meant here as a starting point showing a commonly used templating method :) –  mfonda Sep 21 '11 at 16:40

While "better" may be in the eye of the beholder, I would suggest having some sort of functions that set the page bits rather than exposing raw variables. For instance, instead of doing $pageTitle = 'Welcome'; you could have set_page_title('Welcome');.

For JavaScript you could have a function that adds to the current script set -- rather than possibly replacing it all -- such as add_javascript($code);. This will allow a developer to set all of these without having to keep track of what the variable name was, and also without needing to global it as well if they want to set it from within a function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So would set_page_title() operate on a global variable or a local variable? Global would mean something like function set_page_title($s) { global $pageTitle; $pageTitle=s; } which doesn't change the fact that the data is being stored in a global, but just hides it from the user. If you're talking about a local variable, could you describe how you'd pass it to the template function? –  Anson Sep 20 '11 at 23:13
1  
You'd need some sort of global variable to store all of the template variables. I'd suggest using an associative array so you only have to global one variable rather than a host of them. And you're correct about it not eliminating the global, just hiding the internals of your template from them. If you should decide that $template['title'] should end up being $template['page_title'], the dev doesn't have to change their code if you update set_page_title(). –  jprofitt Sep 21 '11 at 14:25

Global variables are generally considered bad, and should be avoided if possible.

Rather than listing every variable in the interface, as you said things could change, pass a single array to the PrintHeader() functions:

<?php
function PrintHeader($opts=array()) {
    if(!isset($opts['title'])) $opts['title'] = 'Default Title';
    echo <<<HEADER
    <html>
     <head>
      <title>$opts['title']</title>
    HEADER;

    if(!empty($opts['scripts'])) {
        foreach($opts['scripts'] as $script) {
            echo "  <script type=\"text/javascript\" src=\"$script.js\"></script>\n";
        }
    }
    echo " </head>\n";
}

$opts = array('title'=>'Welcome',
              'scripts'=>array('script1', 'script2'));
require('header.php');
PrintHeader($opts);
?>

This way, you can add new capabilities in the function without breaking old code.

share|improve this answer
1  
thats doesn't looks like a template at all. But more like some terrible spaghetti mess –  Your Common Sense Sep 20 '11 at 18:25
    
It's not my code, this is the OP's code. I just showed how to use a hashed array in place of glabal varaibles –  steveo225 Sep 20 '11 at 18:49
    
you've made it even worse. –  Your Common Sense Sep 20 '11 at 18:50
    
Agreed... this is soup –  Chris Baker Sep 20 '11 at 18:51
    
How is it worse? –  steveo225 Sep 20 '11 at 18:52

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