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I have an interesting problem. I'd like to create a generic class that can deal with both Reference types as well as Nullable<T> types. Basically I want something like:

public class ClassWithNull<T>
{
    public T varName = null;
}

Now this, of course, does not compile because not all types can be assigned null, namely non-nullable value types. But the problem is Nullable<T> is a value type, so simply adding where T : class doesn't help me. My generics-foo is not too strong, but I haven't been able to find any way to say that T must either be a reference type or a nullable value type.

The idea I have to solve this is to make ClassWithNull<T> an abstract class. I could then add two sub-classes, one to deal with reference types and one to deal with nullable value types. Then, a static factory method in the base class could use reflection to determine which sub-class ought to be constructed. Something like:

public static ClassWithNull<T> CreateClassWithNull<T>()
{
    StackTrace st = new StackTrace();
    Type type = st.GetFrame(1).GetMethod().GetGenericArguments()[0];
    if (!type.IsValueType)
    {
        return new ClassWithReferenceType<T>();
    }
    else if (type == typeof(Nullable))
    {
        return new ClassWithNullableValueType<T>();
    }
    else
    {
        throw new Exception("Must provide nullable type.");
    }
}

The problem here is that generics are resolved statically. If ClassWithReferenceType<U> expects U to be a reference type, then calling new ClassWithReferenceType<T>() in the factory method is a compilation error since T is not required to be a reference type. The compiler does not know about the run time check.

Any ideas about how to implement such a thing?

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Note that T x = null; will only compile if x is nullable, but T x = default(T) and x == null will always compile (it just always returns false for non-nullable types). –  Gabe Sep 20 '11 at 18:44
    
In your code, typeof(Nullable) refers to another type than you think, namely a static class which is non-generic. Instead one can say type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>). An alternative in this specific case is Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) != null. Also, it looks like you can use typeof(T) instead of what you call type. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 19 at 14:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about:

public class ClassWithNull<T>
{
    public T varName = default(T);
}

(Actually, you don't even need the assignment - you can just leave it to be the default value on construction. But you might want default(T) for local variables.)

That won't stop you from using it incorrectly with a non-nullable value type - but is that enough?

If that doesn't help you, I would suggest writing two static methods, like this:

public static ClassWithNull<T> CreateClassWithNullForClass<T> where T : class
{
    return new ClassWithReferenceType<T>();
}

public static ClassWithNull<T> CreateClassWithNullForNullable<T> where T : struct
{
    return new ClassWithNullableValueType<T>();
}

The field in ClassWithNullableValueType would be Nullable<T> - T would be the underlying type.

Now if you want overloads of the same method, that gets a little harder, particularly if you don't want to pass any parameters. It's possible, but really, really horrible.

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I don't think he's interested in default(T) as it can be not null in some cases. His intention is rather to allow only to assign null ("must either be a reference type or a nullable value type"). –  Wiktor Zychla Sep 20 '11 at 18:42
    
@Wiktor: default(T) is always the null value for any T which has a null value. But there's no constraint which will allow this to be expressed. See the rest of my answer for further options though... –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '11 at 18:45
    
Your edited answer contains just the solution I thought about. –  Wiktor Zychla Sep 20 '11 at 18:48
    
Yeah, the first solution is not sufficient. However the second one is brilliant. I have no idea why having two factory methods never occurred to me. I'll accept this answer in three minutes (why does SO prevent the asker from accepting an answer within 10 mins?) –  jjoelson Sep 20 '11 at 18:49
    
@WiktorZychla: Goodo. I think I'd probably still stick with the first approach if possible though :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '11 at 18:50

You should be able to do this instead:

public class ClassWithNull<T>
{
    private object varName_priv = null;

    public T varName {
        get { return (T)varName_priv; }
        set { varName_priv = value; }
    }
}

This works because every non-pointer type in C# is convertible to object, including value types.

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