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Let's say I have some classes defined as follows:

class Security
{
    Boolean AuthenticateUser(String username, String password);
    Boolean AddUser(String username, String password);
    // many more methods
}

class NetworkedDevice
{
    void Stop();
    void Start();
    // many more methods
}

Then I have another class that contains instances of the above classes. How can I avoid code like the following? I want all the methods of class1 and class2 exposed via this class.

class MyWindowsService
{
     Security _security = new Security();
     NetworkDevice _netDevice = new NetworkDevice();

     Boolean AuthenticateUser(String username, String password)
     {
          return _security.AuthenticateUser(username, password);
     }
     // all the rest of "Security" methods implemented here

     void StopNetworkDevice()
     {
          _netDevice.Stop();
     }

     void StartNetorkDevice()
     {
          _netDevice.Start();
     }
     // all the rest of "NetDevice" methods implemented here
}

Edit I've updated the code to be more real to what I am doing. I am hosting a WCF service within a windows service. The windows service does several things including user authentication and communication to networked devices to name a few. The implementation of my WCF interface calls methods of the "MyWindowsService" class. Exposing the underlying objects as properties is the answer I was looking for. The above class then looks something like:

class MyWindowsService
{
     SecurityClass _security = new SecurityClass();
     NetworkDevice _netDevice = new NetworkDevice();

     Public NetworkDevice NetDevice
     {
          get { return _netDevice; }
     }

     Public SecurityClass Security
     {
          get { return _security; }
     } 
}
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1  
If you're exposing all of the methods, why not just expose the member? –  FishBasketGordo Sep 20 '11 at 18:52
1  
Can you tell us more about the problem you're trying to solve? There may be a better way... –  Chris Marasti-Georg Sep 20 '11 at 18:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, if you're using composition (as you are) there is no "easier way"; you just have to wrap the methods you want to expose. If you want to expose all of the methods of the composed type, then why are you using composition in the first place? You may as well just expose oneClass and twoClass via public properties as it is functionally no different than wrapping every method and property/public field.

If it makes sense that they belong in the inheritance chain then SuperClass (oddly named as it would be a sub class...) should inherit from one of those classes. Of course you can't inherit from both in C#, but this design makes me suspect that there may be a better overall approach. It is impossible to tell from your code sample though as you don't tell us what you are actually trying to accomplish with these types.

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Maybe this could help you

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/codegen/decorators.aspx

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Unfortunately there is no magic ways to do that as multiple type inheritance is not allowed in .NET.

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You cannot do this easily in C#. You could inherit from one of the classes, and create delegates for the other, or you can manually create delegates for both (by delegate, I just mean a method that delegates to the member object, not anything to do with the delegate keyword or class).

If you use a product such a Resharper, there is an option in the Refactor menu that will automate this process, called "Create delegates..."

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You can make class1 public and then reference them directly:

SuperClass.class1.MethodFirst();

Of course, static methods will be ok, you will have to construct class1 for instance methods.

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in C#, you cannot combine class hierarchies the way you can in Java but you can enforce a contract through iterfaces.

Create an interface for Class1 and Class2 then have SuperClass implement those interfaces. You'll still code up the method calls, but at least you'll have some compile-time checking in place. Perhaps you could also Create a method in SuperClass that dispatches to the appropriate class/method using reflection.

Another approach might be to setup an inheritance chain where SuperClass extends Class2 which extends Class1.

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If you're just going to wrap every single method/property/field of these objects anyway it is overkill; you may as well just expose the objects themselves. –  Ed S. Sep 20 '11 at 19:06

There is one more way: T4 Templates. See here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/gg558520

The resulting CS file is generated at build time. This means you could potentially loop your classes using refelection and the result would be what you have now manually created in your "SuperClass".

The cool thing really is that the resulting code is generated on the fly and it is typesafe.

Is it worth the effort? I don't know. It really depends what you are doing and why you are doing it.

We use it for instance to translate Func<T1, T2> into "real" delegates and auto-generate wrapper classes that way.

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