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In the following code

NSDictionary *test;

switch (xxx) {
  case 1:
   ...
   return YES;
   break;

  case 2:
   ...
   return NO;
   break;

  case 3:
   ...
   return YES;
   break;
}

[test release];

will the "test" variable be properly released or should there be a separate release statement w/in each switch case statement?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

every time you return XXX;, release is not called on your object. I suggest to refrain from returning mid-procedure. Better to do something like:

BOOL result = NO;
switch (xxx) {
  case 1: ... result = YES; break;
  case 2: ... result = NO; break;
  case 3: ... result = YES; break;
  default: result = NO;
}
[test release];
return result;
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If you always want test to be released, just use [test autorelease] before the switch statement, which will cause release to be called on test sometime after the function returns.

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If it's a class' field you should release it in dealloc method, else, if it's a local variable (as it seems in your case), you should release it before it gets out of scope (unless, of corse, the method's aim is to return a dynamically allocated variable).

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As it is a local scope variable, and as long as you do not leave (return) before the end of the switch block, it will be ok to release it after the switch statement.

If you do not alloc it inside a one of the cases statements, it will remain nil and there is no problem with sending release messages to a nil element, it is ok to release it after the switch statement.

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Besides the good solutions given, you can do this:

@try {
    switch(xxx) {
        case 1:
            ...
            return YES;
            break;

        case 2:
            ...
            return NO;
            break;

        case 3:
            ...
            return YES;
            break;
    }
} @finally {
    [test release];
}

Finally blocks run even after a return.

The autorelease solution probably looks cleaner, but if for some reason you really don't want to use autorelease you can do this.

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+1 For interesting, but definitely an abuse of the exception handling syntax. :) –  Ben Zotto Sep 21 '11 at 0:47

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