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I'm trying to pass optional arguments to my class decorator in python. Below the code I currently have:

class Cache(object):
    def __init__(self, function, max_hits=10, timeout=5):
        self.function = function
        self.max_hits = max_hits
        self.timeout = timeout
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args):
        # Here the code returning the correct thing.


@Cache
def double(x):
    return x * 2

@Cache(max_hits=100, timeout=50)
def double(x):
    return x * 2

The second decorator with arguments to overwrite the default one (max_hits=10, timeout=5 in my __init__ function), is not working and I got the exception TypeError: __init__() takes at least 2 arguments (3 given). I tried many solutions and read articles about it, but here I still can't make it work.

Any idea to resolve this? Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

@Cache(max_hits=100, timeout=50) calls __init__(max_hits=100, timeout=50), so you aren't satisfying the function argument.

You could implement your decorator via a wrapper method that detected whether a function was present. If it finds a function, it can return the Cache object. Otherwise, it can return a wrapper function that will be used as the decorator.

class _Cache(object):
    def __init__(self, function, max_hits=10, timeout=5):
        self.function = function
        self.max_hits = max_hits
        self.timeout = timeout
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args):
        # Here the code returning the correct thing.

# wrap _Cache to allow for deferred calling
def Cache(function=None, max_hits=10, timeout=5):
    if function:
        return _Cache(function)
    else:
        def wrapper(function):
            return _Cache(function, max_hits, timeout)

        return wrapper

@Cache
def double(x):
    return x * 2

@Cache(max_hits=100, timeout=50)
def double(x):
    return x * 2
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks guys and @lunixbochs for your solution! Works like a charm :) – Dachmt Sep 20 '11 at 21:56
2  
If the developer callsCache with positional instead of keyword arguments (e.g. @Cache(100,50)) then function will be assigned the value 100, and max_hits 50. An error won't be raised until the function is called. This could be considered surprising behavior since most people expect uniform positional and keyword semantics. – unutbu Sep 20 '11 at 22:06
@Cache
def double(...): 
   ...

is equivalent to

def double(...):
   ...
double=Cache(double)

While

@Cache(max_hits=100, timeout=50)
def double(...):
   ...

is equivalent to

def double(...):
    ...
double = Cache(max_hits=100, timeout=50)(double)

Cache(max_hits=100, timeout=50)(double) has very different semantics than Cache(double).

It's unwise to try to make Cache handle both use cases.

You could instead use a decorator factory that can take optional max_hits and timeout arguments, and returns a decorator:

class Cache(object):
    def __init__(self, function, max_hits=10, timeout=5):
        self.function = function
        self.max_hits = max_hits
        self.timeout = timeout
        self.cache = {}

    def __call__(self, *args):
        # Here the code returning the correct thing.

def cache_hits(max_hits=10, timeout=5):
    def _cache(function):
        return Cache(function,max_hits,timeout)
    return _cache

@cache_hits()
def double(x):
    return x * 2

@cache_hits(max_hits=100, timeout=50)
def double(x):
    return x * 2

PS. If the class Cache has no other methods besides __init__ and __call__, you can probably move all the code inside the _cache function and eliminate Cache altogether.

share|improve this answer
1  
unwise or not... if the developer does accidentally use @cache instead of cache(), it'll make a weird error when they try to call the resulting function. the other implementation actually works as both cache and cache() – lunixbochs Sep 20 '11 at 21:50
    
Thanks @unutbu, good solution too. – Dachmt Sep 20 '11 at 21:55
1  
@lunixbochs: A developer who confuses cache_hits (nee cache) with cache_hits() is just as likely to confuse any function object with a function call, or mistake a generator with an iterator. Even moderately experienced Python programmers should be used to paying attention to the differenc. – unutbu Sep 20 '11 at 22:22

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