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I have a 49 space one dimensional array declared as int boardArray [49]; and I also have a two dimensional 7x7 array declared as int boardArrayTwo [7][7]' I am trying to use nested for loops to throw the one dimensional array into the two dimensional array here is the code I am using to test it.

for (int i = 0; i > 50; ++i)
{
    boardArray[i] = i; //fills the array with ints 0 - 48 to test
}
for (int x = 0; x >= 7; ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k >= 7; ++k)
    {
        for (int n = 0; n >= 49; ++n)
        {
            boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[n];
            cout << boardArrayTwo[x][k] << " " << endl;
        }

    }
}

I tried running this but nothing happens. Am I doing it wrong?

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1  
The loops headed by for (int n = 0; n >= 49; ++n) and for (int x = 0; x >= 7; ++x) are going to run exactly 0 times. That's why nothing will happen. –  David Nehme Sep 20 '11 at 23:17

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted
for (int x = 0; x >= 7; ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k >= 7; ++k){
         for (int n = 0; n >= 49; ++n)
    {

this is wrong. x and k should be < 7 (and the third cycle shouldn't be used) :

for (int x = 0; x < 7; ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < 7; ++k){
        boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[7*x + k];

EDIT:

like @Fabio Ceconello make me notice in his comment, even the first loop is wrong because of the inverted condition checks, it should be modified this way:

for (int i = 0; i < 49; ++i)
{
    boardArray[i] = i; //fills the array with ints 0 - 48 to test
}
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Not only that, all the conditionals in the loops have inverted logic. –  Fabio Ceconello Sep 20 '11 at 23:10
    
@Fabio What do you mean? –  Ziggy Sep 20 '11 at 23:11
    
what's wrong? I'm not understanding the objections. could you both clarify to me? –  Heisenbug Sep 20 '11 at 23:13
    
You should include what was mentioned below by Fabio. That would make your answer the best I think. –  Ziggy Sep 20 '11 at 23:14
    
oh.you are right. I completely forgot the first cycle. I'll edit my answer thanks –  Heisenbug Sep 20 '11 at 23:15

It looks like your destination array is in row-major order. You could just blast the source array directly into place.

memcpy(boardArrayTwo, boardArray, 49 * sizeof(int));

or if you prefer something in more idiomatic C++:

std::copy(boardArray, boardArray + 49, reinterpret_cast<int*>(boardArrayTwo));
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+1 because you taught me something! –  Ziggy Sep 20 '11 at 23:23
    
I hate casts. How about std::copy(&boardArray[0], &boardArray[49], &boardArrayTwo[0][0]); –  Robᵩ Sep 20 '11 at 23:53
    
@Rob, that works too. I don't mind the new C++ casts too much. They stand out in the code so you can find them and they give the compiler a chance to catch some misuse. –  Blastfurnace Sep 21 '11 at 0:43

Apart from the inverted logic in the loops (which the others mentioned), there's no need for the third inner loop. Just put the attribution in the second inner loop:

boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[x * 7 + k];

EDIT: I should also mention that all these literals aren't good practice, and I added one more (7) above. I'd rewrite the code as follows:

#define arrlen(x) (sizeof(x)/sizeof((x)[0]))

for (int i = 0; i < arrlen(boardArray); ++i)
{
    boardArray[i] = i; 
}
int stride = arrlen(boardArrayTwo[0]);
for (int x = 0; x < arrlen(boardArrayTwo); ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < stride; ++k)
    {
        boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[stride * x + k];
        cout << boardArrayTwo[x][k] << " " << endl;
    }
}

caveat: if the arrays aren't declared here (were passed as parameters), arrlen() won't work. But that's another long story...

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I just noticed that! –  Ziggy Sep 20 '11 at 23:13
    
+1: correct and synthetic answer –  Heisenbug Sep 20 '11 at 23:18
    
Hey but there is also the matter than 0 <= 7 gives him 8 values. That's too many for his tiny tiny arrays! –  Ziggy Sep 20 '11 at 23:22
    
Right, he should use x < and k <, not x <= & etc. –  Fabio Ceconello Sep 20 '11 at 23:29

You used i > 50 in your for loop. It should be i < 49 and same for all the other loops.

Also, this won't work. You're setting all of the boardArrayTwo[][] values to boardArray[49] You should instead do something like this:

for (int x = 0; x < 7; ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < 7; ++k)
    {
        boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[7*x + k];
        cout << boardArrayTwo[x][k] << " " << endl;
    }
}

or

int count = 0;

for (int x = 0; x < 7; ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < 7; ++k)
    {
        boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[count];
        cout << boardArrayTwo[x][k] << " " << endl;
        count++;
    }
}
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Ah, right. Edited. –  quasiverse Sep 20 '11 at 23:58

First of all, the second term in the for loop says the for loop would run while that condition is true. So you should use < instead of >= for all your loops.

Second, the loop over n is extra and shouldn't be there. What you need is to go through x and k, then copy the corresponding element from boardArray to boardArrayTwo.

You could do one of these:

int n = 0;
for (int x = 0; x < 7; ++x)
    for (int k = 0; k < 7; ++k)
    {
        boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[n];
        ++n;
    }

or use a formula to calculate the proper n:

for (int x = 0; x < 7; ++x)
    for (int k = 0; k < 7; ++k)
        boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[x*7+k];

I wrote x*7+k because it seems like x is iterating over the rows of the array, each row having 7 elements, says that x*7+kth element of the boardArray represents position [x][k] of boardArrayTwo/

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This is the answer. –  Ziggy Sep 20 '11 at 23:23

Note

for (int i = 0; i > 50; ++i)

if i is initialized to 0, it won't be greater than 50 and thus it will never enter the loop.

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In each of your loops you used greater than or equal (>) to rather than less than (<) or equal to. You should also notice that, as Fabio points out above, the third nested loop is setting boardArrayTwo[x][k] to 0-49 over and over again, 49 times. You will need to use arithmetic to manipulate x and k so that they will be an index into boardArray, and then assign that index to boardArrayTwo[x][k].

It's also important that you are using 0..7 inclusive, which is actually 8 positions. Your array are only of length 7 so you are actually ending up with some garbage values in there.

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int main () {

    int boardArray[49];
    int boardArrayTwo[7][7];

for (int i = 0; i < 50; ++i)
{
    boardArray[i] = i; //fills the array with ints 0 - 48 to test
}
for (int x = 0; x < 7; ++x)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < 7; ++k)
    {
            boardArrayTwo[x][k] = boardArray[x*7 + k];
            cout << boardArrayTwo[x][k] << " " << endl;
    }
}

}

With any luck (unless I am embarrassing myself) this should do the trick!

EDIT: Special thanks to Fabio!

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It won't work fine. Even with reversed operators, he's still setting all of the boardArrayTwo[x][k] values to boardArray[49]. –  quasiverse Sep 20 '11 at 23:14
for(int i=0; i<49; i++)
b[i]=(i+1);

int p=0;
for(int i=0;i<7;i++){
        for(int j=0;j<7;j++)
        {a[i][j]=b[p];
        p++;}
        }

beside other errors, third loop is making your code wrong

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