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Say I have two arrays of string, named 'arrayone' and 'arraytwo' How would I go about sorting the 'arrayone' alphabetically (from A to Z), while still keeping relations to my second array.

Incase you were wondering what is in 'arrayone' and 'arraytwo', 1 has surnames and 2 has the ages of each person. My end result is to add it to a richedit.

Example of scenario:

Smith           25 
Appleseed       32
Gibbs           45

Must turn into:

Appleseed       32
Gibbs           45
Smith           25

Please no stringlist, keep it in simple array and in a procedure.

UPDATE: I switched to record.

Tried this code with no avail

for i := 0 to 26 do
for j := 0 to 26 do
  if recordname.surname[j] > recordname.surname[j+1] then begin
    line := recordname.surname[j];
    line[j] := recordname.surname[j+1];
    recordname.surname[j+1] := line;
  end;

It says Incompatible Types: 'Char' and 'String'

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2  
What have you tried so far? –  BlackJack Sep 20 '11 at 23:32
    
Your data structure is wrong. You don't have two arrays. You have a single array, and each element is a name, value pair. Please consider switching to the correct data structure before proceeding. –  David Heffernan Sep 20 '11 at 23:34
    
@David, I have two arrays. How would I go about merging this into a multi-dimensional array and then proceeding? –  noob Sep 20 '11 at 23:36
    
You want array of record. In modern Delphi you would use TList<TStringIntegerPair>. –  David Heffernan Sep 20 '11 at 23:37
    
@BlackJack, I'm doing a BubbleSort. Not much so far yet –  noob Sep 20 '11 at 23:37
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Having given you advice about your data structure, and seen the ensuing struggles, I want to put things straight and explain more clearly what I mean.

You original code had two arrays that were essentially unconnected. You could swap items in one array and easily forget to do so for the other array. It looks to me like the name/age pairs really should not be split apart. This leads to the following type declaration.

type
  TPerson = record
    Name: string;
    Age: Integer;
  end;

Now you need to hold an array of TPerson.

type
  TPersonArray = array of TPerson;

In order to perform a sort you need to be able to compare two items, and swap them.

function Compare(const Person1, Person2: TPerson): Integer;
begin
  Result := CompareText(Person1.Name, Person2.Name);
end;

procedure Swap(var Person1, Person2: TPerson);
var
  temp: TPerson;
begin
  temp := Person1;
  Person1 := Person2;
  Person2 := temp;
end;

Now we can put this all together with a bubble sort.

procedure Sort(var People: TPersonArray);
var
  i, n: Integer;
  Swapped: Boolean;
begin
  n := Length(People);
  repeat
    Swapped := False;
    for i := 1 to n-1 do begin
      if Compare(People[i-1], People[i])>0 then begin
        Swap(People[i-1], People[i]);
        Swapped := True;
      end;
    end;
    dec(n);
  until not Swapped;
end;

Now, if you wanted to use a more complex comparison operator then you could simply replace Compare. For example, if you wanted to order by age any people that have the same name, then you use a lexicographic comparison function.

function Compare(const Person1, Person2: TPerson): Integer;
begin
  Result := CompareText(Person1.Name, Person2.Name);
  if Result=0 then begin
    Result := Person2.Age-Person1.Age;
  end;
end;

I have written this answer piece by piece and that is how you should approach a larger problem like this. Try to break it down in to smaller pieces, each of which is manageable.

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+1. A really good answer. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 21 '11 at 7:03
    
Bubble sort is just a performance nightmare. But whatever, I know this is for didactic purpose here, and you made a clear answer from a confused question. –  Arnaud Bouchez Sep 21 '11 at 9:30
    
@arnaud Agreed. –  David Heffernan Sep 21 '11 at 11:22
    
Calling CompareText in a long loop is about 3 times slower than casting the record string directly (tested), you are better off just doing "if person[a].name < person[b].name" directly in the loop rather than calling CT everytime, even inline that approach is still slower. –  hikari Oct 29 '12 at 13:51
1  
@hikari: CompareText is case-insensitive. If you're going to compare two methods, make sure they do the same thing; you’d have to change it to CompareStr, or write if LowerCase(person[a].name) < LowerCase(person[b].name). –  Martijn Mar 23 '13 at 9:15
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Our TDynArray wrapper just handle this feature explicitly.

You can sort any existing dynamic array directly in-place, or using an integer array of indices, with a custom sort function.

function PersonCompare(const Person1, Person2: TPerson): Integer;
begin // sample function pasted from David's answer
  Result := CompareText(Person1.Name, Person2.Name);
  if Result=0 then 
    Result := Person2.Age-Person1.Age;
end;

type
  TPersonDynArray = array of TPerson;

function SortPersons(var Persons: TPersonDynArray);
var
  Person: TDynArray;
begin
  Person.Init(TypeInfo(TPersonDynArray),Persons);
  Person.Compare := PersonCompare;
  Person.Sort;
end;

By the way, the Sort method of the wrapper will use an optimized Quick Sort, which is much faster than Bubble Sort algorithm.

There are much more features in this wrapper, e.g. TList-like methods like Add() or Delete(), use of an external Count variable (much faster adding), serialization or fast find using hashing.

It works from Delphi 5 up to XE2, and is Open Source.

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Sort the first array as normal, using the sorting algorithm of your choice. Any introductory algorithm textbook will have several. Each time you swap two entries of the first array, make the same change to the corresponding entries of the second array.

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That will work, but the design (of using separate arrays) is a bit flaky, IMO. –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 21 '11 at 6:58
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Without creating a new structure that contains both sets of data points, you can sort an array of indices with a comparison function that checks based on arrayone.

more concretely, create an array indices with indices[i] = i initially.

Then, sort indices using the comparison function

i < j iff arrayone[indices[i]] < arrayone[indices[j]]

Then, reading arrayone[indices[0]], arrayone[indices[1]] ... gives you the sorted list, and the corresponding values are arraytwo[indices[0]], arraytwo[indices[1]], ...

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The solution is correct, but the syntax isn't (for Delphi). Still, +1. –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 21 '11 at 6:54
    
FWIW correct syntax: if arrayone[indices[i]] < arrayone[indices[j]] then Result := 1 else if arrayone[indices[i]] > arrayone[indices[j]] then Result := -1 else Result := 0;, but properly formatted of course. No need to check if i < j here. –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 21 '11 at 6:57
    
@Rudy: The line i < j iff ... is probably written in another languange, namely, the languange of mathematics (with some elements of pseudocode). As you probably know, iff stands for 'if and only if', that is, a logical equivalence. –  Andreas Rejbrand Sep 21 '11 at 7:05
    
@RudyVelthuis You didnt indicate which version of delphi you were using, so I just gave a high level description –  Foo Bah Sep 21 '11 at 7:09
    
I did not ask the question. The syntax is actually the same for all versions of Delphi, so the exact version does not matter. –  Rudy Velthuis Sep 21 '11 at 10:08
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