Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I may just be missing something simple, but I am relatively inexperienced so it is likely. I've searched extensively for a solution without success.

I am using the fields_for function to build a nested form using the accepts_nested_attributes_for function. If the submit on the form fails the params are passed to the render of the new template only for the parent model. How do I pass the nested params for the child model so that fields that have been filled out previously remain filled. Note that I am using simple_form and HAML but I assume this shouldn't impact the solution greatly.

My models:

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name
  has_many :users,  :dependent => :destroy
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :users, :reject_if => proc { |a| a[:email].blank? }, :allow_destroy => true
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :email, :password, :password_confirmation
  belongs_to :account
end

My accounts controller:

def new
  @account = Account.new
  @account.users.build
end

def create
  @account = Account.new(params[:account])
  if @account.save
    flash[:success] = "Welcome."
    redirect_to @account
  else
    @account.users.build
                           <- I suspect I need something here but unsure what
    render :new
  end
end

The key part of the accounts/new view:

= simple_form_for @account do |f|
  = f.input :name
  = f.simple_fields_for :users do |u|
    = u.input :email
    = u.input :password
    = u.input :password_confirmation
  = f.button :submit, :value => "Sign up"

My params on a failed save are:

:account    {"name"=>"In", "users_attributes"=>{"0"=>{"email"=>"u@e.com", "password"=>"pass", "password_confirmation"=>"pass"}}}

As you can see, the key information, in the users_attributes section, is stored but I can't seem to have the email address default into the new form. Account name on the other hand is filled automatically as per Rails standard. I'm not sure if the solution should live in the accounts controller or in the accounts/new view, and have not had any luck with either.

Answers with .erb are, of course, fine.

I'm fairly new to Ruby and Rails so any assistance would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Do you need @account.users.build in the create statement? It seems like that might be erasing whatever is built by Account.new. Also, do you need make users_attributes accessible in your Account model? –  Beerlington Sep 21 '11 at 1:15
    
@Beer. The @account.users.build is required in create to show the user fields on the new form, otherwise all you get is the Account fields - as I understand it's basically like calling User.new but it is linked through the account. Not sure about the users_attributes - the trick to me is that they are visible in the params, but nested and so not available to the form fields. I'm a little new at all this, how would I make them accessible in the Account Model? –  nmott Sep 21 '11 at 1:38
    
You certainly should not need the 2nd users.build on create failure. You do need one in new, as it generates a fresh new user to populate the form. But after create fails, @account.users should already contain the new user(s) passed in via params. You should log the contents of @account.users after create fails to see if it contains a record. If it does (it should), my first suspect would be simple form (just because I'm unfamiliar with it). BTW, why is the form failing on that submission? I don't see any validations. –  numbers1311407 Sep 21 '11 at 4:54
    
@numbers1311407 Added the users.build on create failure as we are simply rendering the new view and not actually running the new controller action. Without the users.build the user fields do not show up on the form - I checked this through testing and it seems right. I have had a look at the params with rails-footnotes and the params contain all the information posted for both the account and user models. I will check out removing simple_form and see if it makes a difference. I have removed some validations from the posted model above to reduce question size. –  nmott Sep 21 '11 at 5:40
    
I promise you that the the 2nd users.build is unnecessary and wrong, unless you really want to build another new user every time the create fails. accepts_nested_attributes_for :users will add a users_attributes= writer to the account to update the account's users, the parameters for which are being passed in the params. 1 of 2 things is happening: either users isn't being set on the record (test for this by logging it in the controller), or the form isn't iterating over the users. –  numbers1311407 Sep 21 '11 at 5:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem lies with attr_accessible, which designates the only attributes allowed for mass assignment.

I feel a bit silly in that I actually stated the problem in a comment last night and failed to notice:

accepts_nested_attributes_for :users will add a users_attributes= writer to the account to update the account's users.

This is true, but with attr_accessible :name, you've precluded every attribute but name being mass-assigned, users_attributes= included. So when you build a new account via Account.new(params[:account]), the users_attributes passed along in params are thrown away.

If you check the log you might note this warning:

WARNING: Can't mass-assign protected attributes: users_attributes

You can solve your original problem by adding :users_attributes to the attr_accessible call in the account class, allowing it to be mass-assigned.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for circling back on this. As I said, I wasn't sure of the implications of my solution above and yours works it out the right way rather than my jury-rigged way. I've updated it all and it works well. Cheers. –  nmott Sep 22 '11 at 1:42

Amazingly, after reading a blog post this evening, and some more trial and error, I worked this out myself.

You need to assign an @user variable in the 'new' action so that the user params are available for use in the 'create' action. You then need to use both the @account and @user variables in the view.

The changes look like this.

Accounts Controller:

def new
  @account = Account.new
  @user = @account.users.build
end

def create
  @account = Account.new(params[:account])
  @user = @account.users.build(params[:account][:user]
  if @account.save
    flash[:success] = "Welcome."
    redirect_to @account
  else        
    render :new
  end
end

The accounts/new view changes to:

= simple_form_for @account do |f|
  = f.input :name
  = f.simple_fields_for [@account, @user] do |u|
    = u.input :email
    = u.input :password
    = u.input :password_confirmation
  = f.button :submit, :value => "Sign up"

In this case the params remain nested but have the user component explicitly defined:

:account    {"name"=>"In", "user"=>{"email"=>"user@example.com", "password"=>"pass", "password_confirmation"=>"pass"}}

It has the additional side effect of removing the @account.users.build from within the else path as @numbers1311407 suggested

I am not certain whether their are other implications of this solution, I will need to work through it in the next few days, but for now I get the information I want defaulted into the view in the case of a failed create action.

@Beerlington and @numbers1311407 I appreciate the help in guiding me to the solution.

share|improve this answer
    
This will work, but what you're doing is actually circumventing accepts_nested_attributes_for and handling the association build manually. Check my new answer for what the real problem was with your original. –  numbers1311407 Sep 21 '11 at 13:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.