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Could anyone please help with C# regular expression for requirement below, please?

  1. should start with 1 and should be 6 digit long.
  2. should start with 7 and should be 6 digit long.
  3. should be 8 digit long.

Update: Apologies not clarifying the requirement. They are individual cases ie. all I need is a regular expression to these specific cases (i.e. 3 in total).

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2  
It can't match all those requirements :) –  Jason McCreary Sep 21 '11 at 1:32
    
This is quite specific requirements. Can you give some samples on what you're trying to match? –  Daryl Teo Sep 21 '11 at 1:33
1  
I'd also take a look at a non-regex approach, especially if it is a portion of code needing performance tuning. The hand-written fine-tuned approach will out perform the equivalent regular expression 99 out of 100 times. And the non-regex code may even be easier to understand from a maintainability standpoint. –  Anthony Sottile Sep 21 '11 at 1:33
    
hi @Jason McCreary, I've updated my requirement. –  Myagdi Sep 21 '11 at 1:55
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here it is:

^((1|7)\d{5}|\d{8})$

or following NullUserException ఠ_ఠ advice:

^([17]\d{5}|\d{8})$
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3  
Or ^([17]\d{5}|\d{8})$ –  NullUserException Sep 21 '11 at 1:33
    
+1 for jumping right in. –  Jason McCreary Sep 21 '11 at 1:34
1  
+1. Except we don't know yet if (8 digits long) condition includes those starting with 1 and 7. –  Daryl Teo Sep 21 '11 at 1:34
    
@Daryl Teo: good point –  zerkms Sep 21 '11 at 1:50
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Not a regular expression, and now verifies a proper integer and save it into output:

string digits = ...
bool valid;
char firstChar;
int output;

switch(digits.Length) 
{
    case 6:
        firstChar = digits[0];
        valid = firstChar == '1' || firstChar == '7';
        break;
    case 8:
        valid = true;
        break;
    default:
        valid = false;
        break;
}

if (valid && int.TryParse(digits, out output))  
{
    ...
}
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1  
+1 for a non-regex solution. –  Jason McCreary Sep 21 '11 at 1:35
    
You sure that's not a regular expression? –  ChaosPandion Sep 21 '11 at 1:35
1  
Why not bool valid = Regex.IsMatch(digits, @"^([17]\d{5}|\d{8})$") instead of 13 lines of code (that is wrong BTW)? –  NullUserException Sep 21 '11 at 1:38
    
@NullUserExceptionఠ_ఠ, now it does and you get the actual integer when you are done –  Joe Sep 21 '11 at 1:44
    
Currently it is fine, but it need to be rewritten in case if in some reason limit of 8 digits will be increased to 10 –  zerkms Sep 21 '11 at 1:49
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