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LINQ to SQL: Return anonymous type?

This is my code:

 class B
    {
        public int age { get; set; }
        public string name { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static List<whatshouldIwritehere> GetList()
        {
            List<B> list = new List<B>() {
                new B(){ age = 10, name = "jaagu" },
                new B(){ age = 20, name = "juggu" },
                new B(){ age = 30, name = "jockey" },
                new B(){ age = 40, name = "jaggu" },
            };

            return (from item in list
                select new { MyAge = item.age, MyName = item.name }).ToList();
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            Console.Read();
        }
    }

Can anybody tell me what should I write in the return type of function GetList()? I know the query creates a anonymous class and I want to work with that class across functions. If I create a custom class with MyAge and MyName then it's very easy to give that in return type. However, is there any other way out ? Had this been in same function I would have used var keyword. But I can't use that here.

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marked as duplicate by pst, BoltClock, Ian Mercer, David Heffernan, Benjol Sep 21 '11 at 6:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The rock and the hard place. You want to name an anonymous type. That's not going to happen. –  David Heffernan Sep 21 '11 at 4:31
3  
Why return an anonymous type? –  BoltClock Sep 21 '11 at 4:31
    
possible duplicate of LINQ to SQL: Return anonymous type? see also stackoverflow.com/questions/7494099/… –  user166390 Sep 21 '11 at 4:32
    
This is a general restriction of Anonymous Types. Since they are not named they cannot be exposed anywhere in a well-typed manner that requires a nominative name. Hopefully the linked answers will provide some insights. –  user166390 Sep 21 '11 at 4:34
    
@everyone: Read Petar Ivanov's answer it would work perfectly though no compile time support. But much better than using reflection or creating loads of "class overloads" –  Jaggu Sep 21 '11 at 4:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can return List<object> or List<dynamic>.

If you return object then you won't be able to access the properties except with reflection. If you return dynamic then you can access the properties, but you lose the compile time check. (So a typo with in property name will result in a runtime exception).

EDIT: You need to specify the type explicitely for the ToList function:

    static List<dynamic> GetList()
    {
        List<B> list = new List<B>() {
            new B(){ age = 10, name = "jaagu" },
            new B(){ age = 20, name = "juggu" },
            new B(){ age = 30, name = "jockey" },
            new B(){ age = 40, name = "jaggu" },
        };

        return (from item in list
                select new { MyAge = item.age, MyName = item.name }).ToList<dynamic>();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
dynamic will work perfectly in my case but I get this error during compilation: "Error 1 Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.List<AnonymousType#1>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<dynamic>'". I don't want to use object. Using object would mean when I try to access properties, I would have to use reflection. –  Jaggu Sep 21 '11 at 4:32
    
Neither of these options seems terribly palatable. –  David Heffernan Sep 21 '11 at 4:32
    
perfect! Thanks Petar. Rather than cross questioning me like why would I want to do that as BoltClock has done, you gave me a perfect answer. –  Jaggu Sep 21 '11 at 4:35
1  
@Jaggu I would have thought you would appreciate sage advice from a high rep user like BoltClock. –  David Heffernan Sep 21 '11 at 4:36
3  
specify the type: .ToList<dynamic>() –  Petar Ivanov Sep 21 '11 at 4:37

You can do this. Reuse class B instead of creating anonymous class.

    static List<B> GetList() 
            { 
....
         return (from item in list 
                    select new B(){age = item.age, name = item.name }).ToList(); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
B doesn't have MyAge and MyName. It only has age and name. –  Jaggu Sep 21 '11 at 4:32
    
use age and name; I have updated. Are you particular about the names MyAge and MyName? Just rename it –  Sandeep G B Sep 21 '11 at 4:34
    
+1; Note: I referenced (stole) your answer and provided some rationale to accompany it. This answer doesn't solve the mechanical problem (how do I return an anonymous type?), but it does give the right answer for the code sample. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 21 '11 at 4:47

Frankly, if you don't want to reuse B, then you should be defining a new type or use another existing type to hold your data (such as a Tuple).

Anonymous types do not have names and you don't have any real type information at compile time so you can't return them from functions. "Patching" your method to return a list of dynamic or object is just that, a patch. It will always be suboptimal as for both options, you will have to resort to using reflection (directly and indirectly).

share|improve this answer

Use dynamic or object

As Peter mentioned, you can use object or dynamic. To do this, add a cast before calling ToList, so you can specify which list type to return:

return (from item in list
        select (dynamic)new { MyAge = item.age, MyName = item.name })
    .ToList();

Or:

return (from item in list
        select new { MyAge = item.age, MyName = item.name })
    .Cast<dynamic>()
    .ToList();

Edit:

Actually, his ToList<dynamic>() is nicer. But keep reading, I think this is still not a good solution for the example you gave...

Reuse B

Instead, As Sandeep mentioned, you can reuse B.

In my opinion, this is the right thing to do. You should follow naming conventions that align with object oriented programming. An object's property names make the most sense when they are instance neutral, and "My" is not instance neutral.

Instead, name your instance my:

foreach(B my in GetList())
{
    Console.WriteLine(my.age);
    Console.WriteLine(my.name);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please do not downvote without explaining why. I didn't just cop answers - I added rationale. Also, Peter didn't have a working example at the time I posted this. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 21 '11 at 22:31

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