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I create a custom memory allocator like following:

class pool_allocator
{
    // required methods
    // ...
private:
    boost::shared_ptr<MemoryChunks> m_t;
};

The purpose of this allocator is to share memory allocating by different container and only deallocate them when all container and deleted. therefore, I use boost::shared_ptr.

However after running it in VS2008, I detect a memory leak. I don't know why.

If I change boost::shared_ptr to MemoryChunks, the memory leak goes away.

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MemoryChunks just like a array of Chunk, each chunk contains a array of objects, and a ptr to the next free object. Since object is never freed unless the Chunk is deleted. allocate/free means O(1). when Memory chunks is deleted, it will free all the chunks. –  xijing dai Sep 21 '11 at 5:41
    
You better post the definition of MemoryChunk, and if possible the implementation of the allocator itself. Are you handling rebings properly? Does it just work if I feed a container a default constructed allocator? etc... –  K-ballo Sep 21 '11 at 5:43
    
@K-ballo thanks. the allocator is part of another library: pool_allocator_stl. I add a new holding policy, which is using boost::shared_ptr to hold them. If I using their default holding policy, no memory leak detected on the stack. –  xijing dai Sep 21 '11 at 5:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Are you aware that allocators are treated as stateless in C++03? Try using your allocator in conjuntion with Boost.Containers (It was just accepted, but I think they are already part of Boost.Interprocess), which respects allocators. Not easy to say anything else without the definition for MemoryChunks.

share|improve this answer
    
MemoryChunks just like a array of Chunk, each chunk contains a array of objects, and a ptr to the next free object. Since object is never freed unless the Chunk is deleted. allocate/free means O(1). when Memory chunks is deleted, it will free all the chunks. –  xijing dai Sep 21 '11 at 5:40

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