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For a problem at school, I need to convert a ASCII string of character digits to a decimal value. I wrote a function to do this and specified the return type to be an unsigned short as you can see in the code below.

#include <stdio.h>
unsigned short str_2_dec(char* input_string, int numel);
int main()
{
  short input;
  char input_string[6]= "65535";

  input = str_2_dec(input_string, 5);

  printf("Final Value: %d", input);
  return 0;
}
unsigned short str_2_dec(char* input_string, int numel)
{
  int factor = 1;
  unsigned short value = 0;
  int index;

  for(index=0; index <(numel-1); index++)
  {
    factor *= 10;
  }

  for(index = numel; index > 0; index--)
  {
    printf("Digit: %d; Factor: %d; ", *(input_string+(numel-index))-48, factor);
    value += factor * ((*(input_string+(numel - index))-48));

    printf("value: %d\n\n", value);

    factor /= 10;
  }
  return value;
}

When running this code, the program prints -1 as the final value instead of 65535. It seems it's displaying the corresponding signed value anyway. Seems like something very simple, but I can't find an answer. A response would be greatly appreciated.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are taking the unsigned short return value of the function and storing it in a (signed) short variable, input. Since the value is outside the range representable in short, and since short is signed, this results in either an implementation-defined result or an implementation-defined signal being raised.

Change the type of input to unsigned short and everything will be fine.

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Lots of pretty good answers. This one is pretty good. Apparently, %d is good. Ensuring that I have a type that is capable of storing the number seems the most fundamental thing. – Darryl McGowan Sep 21 '11 at 6:02

The return type for str_2_dec() is unsigned short but you are storing the value in a (signed) short variable. You should declare your variables the appropriate type otherwise you will have problems as you have observed.

In this case, you converted "65535" to an unsigned short which has the bit pattern FFFFHex. That bit pattern was reinterpreted as a (signed) short which is the decimal value -1.

You should change your main() to something like this:

int main()
{
    unsigned short input; /* to match the type the function is returning */
    char input_string[6]= "65535";

    input = str_2_dec(input_string, 5);

    printf("Final Value: %hf", input);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
If the variable was declared unsigned, then the specifier would just work since short values get promoted to ints when passed by means of ellipsis. – K-ballo Sep 21 '11 at 5:44
    
Indeed, this is not the problem. %d is perfectly valid for printing unsigned short or short, assuming short is strictly narrower than int. – R.. Sep 21 '11 at 5:50
    
@K-ballo: Except on systems where sizeof(short) == sizeof(int), but behavior is still guaranteed correct on such systems for values in the range 0..INT_MAX. – Dietrich Epp Sep 21 '11 at 5:51
    
@Dietrich Epp: In systems where sizeof(short) == sizeof(int) the value would still be printed the same for the %d specifier, thats why its important that he declares input as unsigned short. – K-ballo Sep 21 '11 at 5:56
    
@K-ballo: Yeah there was a number of issues with the code, I just focused on the wrong part. Unfortunately when some people say that a function returns something, they mean they printed something and I focused on that. I (incorrectly) assumed that the other variable types were all appropriate. – Jeff Mercado Sep 21 '11 at 5:56

You mean that is printing index as it was a (signed) short here?

short input;
...
printf("Final Value: %d", input);

Update: Since the hint doesn't seem to be catching, I will be more direct: Your declaration of input should be unsigned short input;.

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You are using the wrong format specifier in printf. try using %u instead of %d

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Wrong, and won't help. – R.. Sep 21 '11 at 5:53

The problem isn't with the function but with how you are printing the return value.

printf("Final Value: %d", input);

The %d is place-holder for int type, not short.

Use %hu instead.

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No, this is not the problem. – R.. Sep 21 '11 at 5:50

You didn't use the correct format specifier for the

short input;
printf("final value=%d\n",input);

This makes the difference of your out put.

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Please don't use u or ur instead of you and your. Also, please capitalize the first letter of the sentence. Those are some of the reasons your posts get downvoted. – agf Oct 25 '11 at 7:38
    
Thanks for your advice i will definately consider it. – Gouse Oct 25 '11 at 7:57

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