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I have this method:

[WebMethod]
public OpenAccountResult OpenAccount()
{
    OpenAccountResult test = new OpenAccountResult(/*true*/)//the true  here wont let the object to be serialized
    {
        //Success = true,
        AccountNumber = "test111"
    };
    return test;
}

OpenAccountResult is actually extending BaseSoapAnswer, so I made BaseSoapAnswer constructor with one bool parameter for Success, but I got an exception that an object with constructor that needs a parameter cannot be serialized.

Exception:

[InvalidOperationException: WebService.Services.TradingSystem.OpenAccountResult cannot be serialized because it does not have a parameterless constructor.]

How do I force every *Result instance to declare bool Success. I want to do it by implementing or inheriting because it there are going to be a lot of *Result and I don't want any other programmer to forget about it.

In the bottom line, I want to build the *Result in the way that every instance will have to set the Success, and if it is forgotten, the code would not be compiled, for safety reasons (You probably understand that if I would not need to be serialized I would not have a problem).

Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Create an additional parameterless constructor and mark it as Obsolete("only for serialization", true). This will allow the compiler to use the constructor, but your user code will not compile when you are trying to use this constructor, even with inheritance:

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    public bool Success { get; set; }

    [Obsolete("only for serialization", true)]
    public MyBaseClass(){}

    public MyBaseClass(bool success) { this.Success = success; }
}

public class MyConcreteClass
{
    [Obsolete("only for serialization", true)]
    public MyConcreteClass() : base() {}

    public MyBaseClass(bool success) : base(success) { /* whatever in this instance */ }
}

you can even leave out the base constructor:

public abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    public bool Success { get; set; }

    public MyBaseClass(bool success) { this.Success = success; }
}

public class MyConcreteClass
{
    [Obsolete("only for serialization", true)]
    /* calling base constructor with false success parameter */
    public MyConcreteClass() : base(false) {}

    public MyBaseClass(bool success) : base(success) { /* whatever in this instance */ }
}
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You need to have a parameter-less constructor in order to be serialized. But you want every Result to have Success = true?

public OpenAccountResult()
{
    Success = true;
}

Or if it's not always true and you want to specify Success, then you can simply have two constructors:

// required for serialization
public OpenAccountResult()
{
}

// alternate constructor for you to use
public OpenAccountResult(bool successValue)
{
    Success = successValue;
}

If you don't want to set every Result constructor, then do it in the base class. If the base class doesn't have a Success property, then make a subclass from which all your result classes can derive:

public abstract class Result : BaseSoapAnswer
{
    public Result()
    {
        this.Success = true;
    }

    public bool Success { get; set; }
}

public class OpenAccountResult : Result 
// ...
public class AnotherResult : Result 
share|improve this answer
    
For your question yes. but your answer does not so much help me because I am going to have 50 *Result classes ans each must declare Success , I need to inherit or implement because this is something that can be forgotten, in case of a single class I would agree, but not 50 classes, I have to provide better solution, thanks for your time –  SexyMF Sep 21 '11 at 6:40
    
You need to better describe your problem. Does the BaseSoapAnswer have a Success property? Maybe you need to rethink your object hierarchy. –  Kirk Broadhurst Sep 21 '11 at 6:54
    
In the bottom line, I want to build the *Result in the way that every one will have to set the Success, and if it is forgotten, the code would not be compiled –  SexyMF Sep 21 '11 at 6:59
    
My question was "Do you want every Result to have Success = true" - you replied "For your question yes". –  Kirk Broadhurst Sep 21 '11 at 9:40
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