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Create new class from a Variable in Java

I have a string

String className = "DummyClass"

Now I want to create a class object where the class name is className That is something like

Object className = new className() // I know it's not possible.

I want to know how to do this...

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marked as duplicate by Joachim Sauer, Jeff Atwood Sep 21 '11 at 7:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

"Using java.lang.reflect" will answer all your questions. First fetch the Class object using Class.forName(), and then:

If I want to instantiate a class that I retrieved with forName(), I have to first ask it for a java.lang.reflect.Constructor object representing the constructor I want, and then ask that Constructor to make a new object. The method getConstructor(Class[] parameterTypes) in Class will retrieve a Constructor; I can then use that Constructor by calling its method newInstance(Object[] parameters):

Class myClass = Class.forName("MyClass");

Class[] types = {Double.TYPE, this.getClass()};
Constructor constructor = myClass.getConstructor(types);

Object[] parameters = {new Double(0), this};
Object instanceOfMyClass = constructor.newInstance(parameters);

There is a newInstance() method on Class that might seem to do what you want. Do not use it. It silently converts checked exceptions to unchecked exceptions.

Note that this method propagates any exception thrown by the nullary constructor, including a checked exception. Use of this method effectively bypasses the compile-time exception checking that would otherwise be performed by the compiler. The Constructor.newInstance method avoids this problem by wrapping any exception thrown by the constructor in a (checked) InvocationTargetException.

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7  
Since java 1.5, constructor.newInstance() is varargs, so constructor.newInstance(new Double(0), this); will do (instead of using the cumbersome Object[] way). Same goes for Class.getConstructor() (no need for ugly Class[]) –  Bohemian Sep 21 '11 at 7:20
2  
@Bohemian, nice. –  Mike Samuel Sep 21 '11 at 7:49
1  
@advocate, a static class is just an inner class that does not have an implicit reference to an instance of its containing class. It still needs to have a constructor. –  Mike Samuel Mar 1 '13 at 0:49
1  
@advocate, if you're trying to invoke a static method, then you don't need the constructor, but you want to call invoke thus: Object returnValue = listMethod.invoke(null, argument0, argument1, argument2);. You pass in null as the value for this since static methods don't run in the context of an instance of the class. –  Mike Samuel Mar 1 '13 at 6:08
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@advocate, Yes. The invoke method is variadic‌​, so you can pass any number of arguments. –  Mike Samuel Mar 1 '13 at 16:01

You can use reflection. For example,

Object o = Class.forName(className).newInstance(); 

But className should contain full path to the class.

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3  
Do not use Class.newInstance. The javadoc specifically says "Use of this method effectively bypasses the compile-time exception checking that would otherwise be performed by the compiler. The Constructor.newInstance method avoids this problem by wrapping any exception thrown by the constructor in a (checked) InvocationTargetException." –  Mike Samuel Sep 21 '11 at 7:12
    
Thanks! I did not know this. –  Ilmirus Sep 21 '11 at 7:15
    
@limirus, Yeah. It's buried pretty deep in the javadoc. –  Mike Samuel Sep 21 '11 at 7:16

Check the answer to this question: What is difference between "Class.forName()" and "Class.forName().newInstance()"? which explains in detail how all this works.

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