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I am trying to write a bool function that looks at the first index in an array which contains a positive or negative number and classifies if it is a negative sign (i.e. -). If it is a negative Sign it returns false everything else returns true. I am trying to figure out how to compare the negative sign. The following code give an error because of the '-'

    bool BigNum::get_positive() const
{
char '-';
if(digits[0] == '-')
{
    return false;
}
else
{
    return true;
}
}
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1  
what do you expect to achieve with this: char '-';? –  Nim Sep 21 '11 at 7:47
1  
There are some existing libraries for big integers [I assume that is what you are trying to do], why reinvent the wheel? –  amit Sep 21 '11 at 7:53
    
Also, this is more of a style issue, but since your function is trying to determine whether an instance of BigNum represents a positive number, why not call it isPositive()? A function called get_X() usually suggests that it's returning some stored info, which is not the case here. –  Anson Sep 21 '11 at 8:02
    
An additional style issue is the if (condition) return true; else return false;, which should logically be return !condition; (without the if). –  James Kanze Sep 21 '11 at 8:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
char '-';

The compiler thinks you're trying to declare a char, but that's not a valid declaration.

Your entire function could be replaced with:

return (digits[0] != '-');

Of course, this is assuming that [0] is a valid index of digits. If not, bad things will happen. If you know the length of the array, you can do a check like this:

if( digits_length < 1 )
  return false;
return (digits[0] != '-');
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1  
Wouldn't this better be written return digits_length > 0 && digits[0] != '-'? (Supposing you want a result in this case: I suspect that throwing an exception, or even aborting, would be more appropriate.) –  James Kanze Sep 21 '11 at 8:11
    
Aha good catch. :) –  Anson Sep 21 '11 at 8:50
    
@James: well, if the string is 0 length then it doesn't start with a -, but it also doesn't represent a number. So it sort of depends how the function is intended to be used. –  Steve Jessop Sep 21 '11 at 8:51
    
@Steve Yes. As often occurs here, we're asked the best implementation of a function without being told what it should do. Since there was some talk of "negative" (which only makes sense on a number), I assumed that this was a precondition, but the original poster really didn't specify. Returning a value (an arbitrary bool, or an enum), throwing an exception, or aborting are all valid responses, depending on the exact specifications of the function. –  James Kanze Sep 21 '11 at 9:24
    
@James: Agreed. Even UB might be reasonable, if as you say it's a precondition that the input be a valid representation of a number. I think I can generalize, people who can fully specify this function would know how to write it (a version that works, I mean, not necessarily agree on the most readable). An expert programmer with absolutely zero knowledge of C syntax might be an exception, but an expert would read a bit rather than ask this sort of question. –  Steve Jessop Sep 21 '11 at 9:34

you must delete or comment "char '-';"

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Mistake lies in line char '-'. '-' is supposed to be stored in some variable which later could be used in if clause to compare. This is a syntactical error because you havn't defined a storage for '-'.

Otherwise as pointed above just delete this line and get away with using '-' in if (as you have already done it)

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