Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

http://jsfiddle.net/sJFLq/1/

what I want is a sort of a mouse-trail effect, when you hover up or down the divs. But if you hover the mouse too fast a few times and then stop, the effect keeps repeating on it's own.

How can I solve this? i think i need some kind of a de-queue thing like with animate option, but for the fadeTo function. any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
Maybe: api.jquery.com/stop –  Felix Kling Sep 21 '11 at 8:17
1  
possible duplicate of How do I stop an effect in jQuery –  bzlm Sep 21 '11 at 8:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the .stop method to stop previous animations. If you pass in true as an argument, it will also clear queued animations.

If I've understood what you're looking for correctly, then what you want is this (you said you want a "mouse trail", which I'm taking to mean you don't want the previous animation to stop as soon as the mouse leaves that element, hence only the one call to .stop):

$(".test").mouseover(function(e){
    $(this).stop(true).fadeTo(200,1);
}).mouseout(function(e){
    $(this).fadeTo(200,0.3);
});

You can see that running here.

share|improve this answer

Exactly as you described it in your title:)

$(".test").mouseover(function(e){
    $(this).stop().fadeTo(200,1);
}).mouseout(function(e){
    $(this).stop().fadeTo(200,0.3);
});
share|improve this answer
    
simply stopping also reduces the smooth trail effect. –  Bluemagica Sep 21 '11 at 8:22
    
@aoi I think James Allardice's answer is exactly what you want! –  Andy Sep 21 '11 at 8:24

Add .stop() for terminating you previous animation: http://jsfiddle.net/sJFLq/5/

$(".test").mouseover(function(e){
    $(this).stop(true, true).fadeTo(200,1);
}).mouseout(function(e){
    $(this).stop(true, true).fadeTo(200,0.3);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Make sure and set the two parameters to stop as desired. The first parameter clears the queue of any other pending animations for this object and the second one jumps to the end of the animation (often required to position the next animation properly). Usually, you want .stop(true, true). The default for both is false. See api.jquery.com/stop for more info. –  jfriend00 Sep 21 '11 at 8:18
    
Thanks, I've updated the sample. –  Samich Sep 21 '11 at 8:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.