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Basically I want to get a handle of the python interpreter so I can pass a script file to execute (from an external application).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 58 down vote accepted

This works in Linux, perhaps in Windows too?

>>> import sys
>>> print sys.executable
/usr/bin/python
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1  
Yep - >>> import sys | >>> print sys.executable | C:\Python25\pythonw.exe –  Smashery Apr 14 '09 at 23:50
1  
Works on Mac OS X too. –  FogleBird Apr 14 '09 at 23:50
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I think in a py2exe compiled app, it would point to the executable for the app, and not the python.exe. Someone would have to confirm though. –  FogleBird Apr 14 '09 at 23:53
    
That only makes sense if you are already running the Python interpreter. I think he's trying to find the location from outside of Python itself. –  John Montgomery Apr 15 '09 at 10:38
    
"programmatically" I think means from within the python interpretter. At least, that's what it meant for me when I can searching for this answer :) –  GreenAsJade Oct 6 '13 at 3:06

sys.executable is not reliable if working in an embedded python environment. My suggestions is to deduce it from

import os
os.__file__
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I think it depends on how you installed python. Note that you can have multiple installs of python, I do on my machine. However, if you install via an msi of a version of python 2.2 or above, I believe it creates a registry key like so:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths\Python.exe

which gives this value on my machine:

C:\Python25\Python.exe

You just read the registry key to get the location.

However, you can install python via an xcopy like model that you can have in an arbitrary place, and you just have to know where it is installed.

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If it is in App Paths you don't even need to know the location do you? ;) –  Gleb Apr 14 '09 at 23:45
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Looking in the registry is not really much use, because you don't know if you are running the python that the one in the registry is talking about. –  GreenAsJade Oct 6 '13 at 3:04

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