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...or are there better ways to implement a Memoization?

Function.memoize = function(callableAsString)
    {
    var r = false, callable, code;
    try
        {
        callable = eval(callableAsString);
        if (typeof callable == "function" && typeof(Function.memoize.cache[callableAsString]) == "undefined")
            {
            code = callableAsString + " = function()" + 
                "{" +
                "var cache = Function.memoize.cache['" + callableAsString + "'];" +
                "var k = Json.stringify([this].concat(arguments));" +
                "return cache.r[k] || (cache.r[k] = cache.c.apply(this, arguments));" +
                "};" +
                "true;";
            if (r = eval(code))
                {
                Function.memoize.cache[callableAsString] = {c: callable, r: {}};
                }
            }
        }
    catch (e) {}
    return r;
    };
Function.memoize.cache = {};
Function.memoize("String.prototype.camelize");

Update based on the suggestions by Felix Kling

Function.memoize = function(callable)
    {
    var r = false;
    if (typeof callable == "function")
        {
        var hash = callable.toString().hashCode();
        r = function()
            {
            var cache = Function.memoize.cache[hash];
            var key = Json.stringify([this].concat(arguments));
            return cache.r[key] || (cache.r[key] = cache.c.apply(this, arguments));
            }
        if (!Function.memoize.cache)
            {
            Function.memoize.cache = {};
            }
        r.memoize = callable;
        Function.memoize.cache[hash] = {c: callable, r: {}};
        }
    return r;
    };

Function.unmemoize = function(callable)
    {
    if (callable.memoize && typeof callable.memoize == "function")
        {
        return callable.memoize;
        }
    else
        {
        return false;
        }
    };

String.prototype.camelize = Function.memoize(String.prototype.camelize);
String.prototype.camelize = Function.unmemoize(String.prototype.camelize);
share|improve this question
2  
I don't see any advantage over just passing a function reference. Also note that JSON.stringify fails if you have objects with circular references. –  Felix Kling Sep 21 '11 at 10:09
    
Thanks for you input. FYI: I'm using a wrapper for JSON.stringify that uses the replacer parameter to handle circular references and the "serialisation" of DOM object. This is required as the arguments array can also contain objects with circular references. –  Joe Scylla Sep 22 '11 at 8:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't see the need for eval... consider this implementation

function memoize(f, cache)
{
    if (!cache) cache = {};
    return function()
    {
        var key = JSON.stringify(arguments);
        return (cache[key] || (cache[key] = [f.apply(this, arguments)]))[0];
    }
}

Note that I deliberately ignored this in the key. The reason is that this may not be serializable by stringify (e.g. because of loops) and this is more the rule than the exception for example when this == window i.e. in the global context.

What is IMO useful is the ability to explictly pass the cache, so that you can for example create a separate cache for each instance or one shared cache for all instances by doing something like:

function MyObj(...)
{
    // every instance has its own cache
    this.foo = memoize(function(...) { ... });

    // there is one shared cache for all instances
    this.bar = memoize(function(...) { ... }, MyObj.memoize_cache);
}

MyObj.memoize_cache = {};
share|improve this answer
    
TBH i'm not satiesfied with your solution because i want object definition and memoization to be separated. The reason i used eval was for seperation and this requires a unique key for the function; callableAsString was that key. You may want to check out the updated version using Function.toString().hashCode() (implementation of java.lang.String.hashCode()) as unique key for the function. You suggestion showed me the way to get rid of eval. Thanks. –  Joe Scylla Sep 22 '11 at 8:33

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