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My BigBlock class needs a few overloaded constructors. All of them need to initialize the same few fields in the same way.

What is the proper way to do this? Is it to make a function, e.g. Initialize in the example below, that does these things, and have all constructors call that function?

public class BigBlock {
    private Thing parentThing;
    Units lengthUnit;
    LabCoordinateSystem labCoordinateSystem;

    private void Initialize(){
        lengthUnit = parentThing.getPreferredUnits(0);
        labCoordinateSystem = parentThing.getCoordinateSystem();
    }

    BigBlock(Thing myThing){
        parentThing= myThing;
        Initialize();
    }

    BigBlock(Thing myThing, double x, double y, double z){
        parentThing= myThing;
        Initialize();
        // more code involving x, y, z
    }

    // a few more constructors

}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Typically it's best to make all constructors chain to a single one which contains the most information, e.g.

BigBlock(Thing myThing) {
    this(myThing, 0, 0, 0); // Assuming 0 is the default value for x, y and z
}

It becomes slightly weirder if there are different ways to call the constructor which don't effectively represent subsets of the same information - but at that point I'd say there's a design smell anyway.

Note that by the time you've got all the real logic in a single constructor, you don't need your Initialize method (which should be initialize to follow Java naming conventions, btw) at all - which may also you can make fields final which previously you couldn't have done.

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Interesting. Why not do it the other way? Intuitively, I would have called the general constructor from the specific constructor i.e. BigBlock(Thing myThing, double x, double y, double z){ this(myThing); // etc } and that's what two other answers suggest. But you may have a reason for preferring it this way round? –  Jean-François Corbett Sep 21 '11 at 10:22
    
@Jean-FrançoisCorbett: It puts all the initialization logic in one place. Also bear in mind that you can't chain to more than one constructor - if you have one constructor taking just a Foo, one constructor taking just a Bar, and one constructor taking both, my approach works - the other doesn't, as you wouldn't be able to call both of the "half"-constructors from the "full" constructor. –  Jon Skeet Sep 21 '11 at 10:24
    
Note that I view the BigBlock(Thing myThing, double x, double y, double z) as the more general constructor, as it allows any sort of initialization. The BigBlock(Thing) constructor is a more specific constructor as it only allows you to initialize with the default values for x, y and z. –  Jon Skeet Sep 21 '11 at 10:25
    
Good arguments. Thanks. –  Jean-François Corbett Sep 21 '11 at 10:31

Just reuse your current constructor. Let every other constructor call the one that initialises all required values.

BigBlock(Thing myThing){
    parentThing = myThing;
    lengthUnit = parentThing.getPreferredUnits(0);
    labCoordinateSystem = parentThing.getCoordinateSystem();

}

BigBlock(Thing myThing, double x, double y, double z){
    this(myThing);
    // more code involving x, y, z
}

If x,y and z need to be part of the initalization, BigBlock(Thing myThing) should call BigBlock(Thing myThing, double x, double y, double z) with default values.

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No - you can call other constructors from a constructor using this.

BigBlock(Thing myThing) {
  this(myThing,0,0,0); // Pass default values for other constructors
}
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As almost always, the answer to 'which is the proper/best way to...' is "depends".

If the logic behind Initialize is specifically coupled to object creation, and Thing is common in all creation aspects, you could model that by inserting that behavior on the simplest constructor, and using it in every other one. That would centralize this usage of the initialisation behavior in only one place.

BigBlock(Thing myThing){
    parentThing= myThing;
    Initialize();
}

BigBlock(Thing myThing, double x, double y, double z){
    this(myThing);
    // more code involving x, y, z
}

In other circumstances, it may be useful to have Initialize as a separate method. For instance, if initialize does some reusable logic, llike a "reset" on the object you may call in a moment different than object creation.

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